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WEEK 8- ARTHUR RIVER, STRAHAN, BOTHWELL, MIDLANDS TAS

Enjoying fine weather on the west coast before heading east

semi-overcast 15 °C

Sunday morning was another beautiful day in Arthur River. We were on the road early and enjoyed the beautiful drive back to Smithton.
Dairying country west of Smithton

Dairying country west of Smithton


Dairying country west of Smithton

Dairying country west of Smithton

We drove east to Burnie and then took the main road down past Cradle Mountain to Strahan. This part of Tasmania relies on logging as the main economic driver. Here are some pictures of the areas.
Taswoods Eucalyptus forests south of Burnie

Taswoods Eucalyptus forests south of Burnie


Taswoods Eucalyptus forests south of Burnie

Taswoods Eucalyptus forests south of Burnie

Zeehan was our lunch stop on Sunday. We had plenty of time to visit the superb West Coast Heritage Centre incorporating the West Coast Pioneers' Museum in the Main Street of Zeehan.
Zeehan School of Mines

Zeehan School of Mines


Zeehan School of Mines and Mettalurgy - 1894-1930

Zeehan School of Mines and Mettalurgy - 1894-1930


Zeehan Gaiety Theatre and Police Station with Court House behind

Zeehan Gaiety Theatre and Police Station with Court House behind


Gaiety Theatre near Zeehan Pioneers Museum

Gaiety Theatre near Zeehan Pioneers Museum


No 8 Krauss Locomotive at Zeehan Pioneers Museum

No 8 Krauss Locomotive at Zeehan Pioneers Museum


Mining machinery at rear of Zeehan Pioneers Museum

Mining machinery at rear of Zeehan Pioneers Museum


Blacksmith's Shop at rear of Zeehan Pioneers Museum

Blacksmith's Shop at rear of Zeehan Pioneers Museum


Beyer-Peacock Locomotive C1 at Zeehan Pioneers Museum

Beyer-Peacock Locomotive C1 at Zeehan Pioneers Museum

King O'Malley, an American, called Zeehan home when he was the Member for West Tasmania. King O'Malley was instrumental in forming "the people's bank", the Commonwealth and in establishing Canberra as the site of the new capital of Australia.
King O'Malley, The West Coast Pioneers Museum

King O'Malley, The West Coast Pioneers Museum

Strahan is 41 km south of Zeehan on the West Coast. Strahan is built on the foreshore of Macquarie Harbour. Macquarie Harbour is a large, shallow, but navigable by shallow draft vessels inlet on the West Coast of Tasmania, Australia. The harbour is named after Scottish Major General Lachlan Macquarie, 5th Governor of New South Wales. The harbour is six times the size of Sydney Harbour And half as big a Port Phillip Bay. Seven large fish farms grow salmon and trout.
View from Railway Station back across to Esplanade, Strahan

View from Railway Station back across to Esplanade, Strahan


Esplanade at Strahan

Esplanade at Strahan


Panorama of Petuna Fish Farm, Macquarie Harbour (4)

Panorama of Petuna Fish Farm, Macquarie Harbour (4)


Petuna Fish Farm, Macquarie Harbour

Petuna Fish Farm, Macquarie Harbour

As Monday was a clear sunny day, we boarded the Lady Jane Franklin 11 for the cruise. Our journey was to take us out to Hell's Gates (the very narrow entrance to Macquarie Harbour) and out into the open sea. The cruise continued on up the Gordon River which empties into Macquarie Harbour. Upstream of the Gordon, it is joined by the Franklin River. We stopped upriver at Heritage Landing.
Esplanade at Strahan

Esplanade at Strahan


David on the Lady Jane Franklin 11

David on the Lady Jane Franklin 11


Sign Franklin - Gordon Wild Rivers NP

Sign Franklin - Gordon Wild Rivers NP


Mouth of Gordon River, Macquarie Harbour

Mouth of Gordon River, Macquarie Harbour


Gordon River

Gordon River


Gordon River

Gordon River


Gordon River

Gordon River


Frenchman's Cap

Frenchman's Cap


Heritage Walk, Gordon River

Heritage Walk, Gordon River


Heritage Walk, Gordon River

Heritage Walk, Gordon River


Heritage Walk, Gordon River

Heritage Walk, Gordon River


Heritage Walk, Gordon River )

Heritage Walk, Gordon River )

After a nice buffet lunch on board the boat as it returned down the Gordon, we stopped off at Sarah Island. The Macquarie Harbour Penal Station was established on Sarah Island, Macquarie Harbour in the former colony of Van Diemen's Land, now Tasmania, Australia, operated between 1822 and 1833. The settlement housed mainly male convicts, with a small number of women. During its 11 years of operation, the penal colony achieved a reputation as one of the harshest penal settlements in the Australian colonies.
Disembarking from  Lady Jane Franklin 11

Disembarking from Lady Jane Franklin 11


Porpoise trailing the Lady Jane Franklin 11 in Macquarie Harbour

Porpoise trailing the Lady Jane Franklin 11 in Macquarie Harbour

The penal station was established as a place of banishment within the Australian colonies. It took the worst convicts and those who had escaped from other settlements. The isolated land was ideally suited for its purpose. It was separated from the mainland by treacherous seas, surrounded by a mountainous wilderness and was hundreds of miles away from the colony's other settled areas. The only seaward access was through a treacherous narrow channel known as Hell's Gates.
Lighthouse at Hell's Gate

Lighthouse at Hell's Gate


Lighthouse at Hell's Gate

Lighthouse at Hell's Gate

Despite its isolated location, a considerable number of convicts attempted to escape from the island. Bushranger Matthew Brady was among a party that successfully escaped to Hobart in 1824 after tying up their overseer and seizing a boat. James Goodwin was pardoned after his 1828 escape and was subsequently employed to make official surveys of the wilderness he had passed through. Sarah Island's most infamous escapee was Alexander Pearce who managed to get away twice. On both occasions, he cannibalized his fellow escapees.
Guide on Sarah Island

Guide on Sarah Island


Sarah Island

Sarah Island

A shipbuilding industry which produced 131 ships was established on the island. Convicts were employed in the shipbuilding industry. For a short period, it was the largest shipbuilding operation in the Australian colonies. Chained convicts had the task of cutting down Huon Pine trees and rafting the logs down the river. Eventually the heavily forested island was cleared by the convicts. A tall wall was then built along the windward side of the island to provide shelter for the shipyards from the roaring forties blowing up the harbour.
Sarah Island

Sarah Island


Sarah Island

Sarah Island


Sarah Island

Sarah Island


Sarah Island

Sarah Island


The Penitentiary, Sarah Island

The Penitentiary, Sarah Island

In the afternoon, we went for a drive down an 11km gravel road to see Macquarie Heads from the shore. Just around the Heads is Ocean Beach. Ocean Beach, at Strahan on the wild west coast of Tasmania, is the highest energy beach in Australia and has recorded the country’s biggest waves, averaging 3 metres. The biggest recorded wave here was over 21 metres. With its dangerous rips and sweeps, this is a beach to admire, not to swim at.
View from road down to Macquarie Heads

View from road down to Macquarie Heads


View from road down to Macquarie Heads

View from road down to Macquarie Heads


View from road down to Macquarie Heads

View from road down to Macquarie Heads


Panorama of Ocean Beach near Strahan

Panorama of Ocean Beach near Strahan


Ocean Beach, Strahan

Ocean Beach, Strahan


Ocean Beach, Strahan

Ocean Beach, Strahan

Late in the afternoon, we attended a performance of "The Ship That Never Was" in Strahan. The Round Earth Theatre Company, founded by Richard Davey, performs in Strahan, West Coast, Tasmania. Each night the company performs Australia's longest-running play, The Ship That Never Was. During the day the actors work as tour guides on Sarah Island explaining the history and unique story of this Tasmanian penal settlement. The play is built around the construction of the ship and ingeniously uses audience members including children to provide additional cast.
The Ship That never Was - Australia's longest running play

The Ship That never Was - Australia's longest running play


The Ship That never Was

The Ship That never Was

Wednesday was overcast as we packed up for our next destination, Queenstown then travelling on the Lyell Highway down to Hamilton. Queenstown is still a thriving mining community. The mountains around the town still show the scars of many decades of mining. The hillsides are still denuded of trees although some rehabilitation has taken place.
View from lookout near Queenstown

View from lookout near Queenstown


Road into Queenstown

Road into Queenstown


Railway Station Queenstown

Railway Station Queenstown


Railway Station Queenstown

Railway Station Queenstown


Lyell Highway east out of Queenstown

Lyell Highway east out of Queenstown

Our next stop was at Nelson Falls in the World Heritage Gordon-Franklin Wild Rivers National Park. These falls were a short 20 minute return trip off the road and were well worth the effort.
Nelson Falls

Nelson Falls


Nelson falls walk in

Nelson falls walk in


Nelson Falls

Nelson Falls


Nelson Falls

Nelson Falls

We called into Lake St Clair but decided not to stay overnight? The walks around the lake looked inviting apart from 9 degree Celsius temperatures in the middle of the day.
Lake St Clair, Cradle Mountain - Lake St Clair National Park

Lake St Clair, Cradle Mountain - Lake St Clair National Park


Lake St Clair, Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park

Lake St Clair, Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park

Just to the east of Derwent Bridge is The Wall in the Wilderness. Primarily made from rare Huon pine, creator/designer Greg Duncan is carving 100 metres of Central Highland history. The Wall is being carved from three-metre high wooden panels is estimated to be complete by 2015. . The carved panels will tell the history of the harsh Central Highlands region - beginning with the indigenous people, then to the pioneering timber harvesters, pastoralists, miners and Hydro workers.
The Wall, Derwent Bridge

The Wall, Derwent Bridge

Further down the Lyell highway! We made a short stop at the Franklin River for a photo stop with Colleen beside the sign just as we did seven years ago when we visited Tassie.
Franklin River, Gordon-Franklin Wild Rivers National Park

Franklin River, Gordon-Franklin Wild Rivers National Park

We had another brief stop at Tarraleah to see the hydro electric Station on the Nive River and the associated plant in Tarraleah. this is a beautiful little town with park like gardens.
Nive River Hydro-Electric Station, Tarraleah

Nive River Hydro-Electric Station, Tarraleah


Nive River Hydro-Electric Station, Tarraleah

Nive River Hydro-Electric Station, Tarraleah


Nive River Hydro-Electric Station, Tarraleah

Nive River Hydro-Electric Station, Tarraleah

Our overnight stop was at the Hamilton Common. These campgrounds had a number of Queensland travellers. The grounds are provided by the council and have hot showers, laundry facilities and are situated beside the Clyde River. It was surprisingly cheap at $5 a night per vehicle.

Campground at Hamilton on banks of the Clyde River

Campground at Hamilton on banks of the Clyde River


Main Street, Hamilton

Main Street, Hamilton


1830 stone house, Hamilton

1830 stone house, Hamilton


Old Post Office, Hamilton

Old Post Office, Hamilton


Old Post Office circa 1835, Hamilton

Old Post Office circa 1835, Hamilton


Roses in Hamilton

Roses in Hamilton

Our last camp stop for the week was at Bothwell, the home of the first golf course in Australia.
Grazing country between Hamilton and Bothwell

Grazing country between Hamilton and Bothwell


Croaker's Alley, Bothwell

Croaker's Alley, Bothwell


Croaker's Alley, Bothwell

Croaker's Alley, Bothwell

We stayed at the council run Bothwell Camping and Caravan park. It was well set up with hot showers and free washer and dryer and only $15 per night. We had the place almost to ourselves. The grounds were behind the Australiasian Golf Museum (Bothwell had the first golf course in Australia) and is accommodated in the old school house. The building housed the two teacher school from 1887 to 1956.

Australiasian Golf Museum, Bothwell

Australiasian Golf Museum, Bothwell


Park across road from Bothwell Golf Museum

Park across road from Bothwell Golf Museum


stone house(1820S) in Market Street, Bothwell

stone house(1820S) in Market Street, Bothwell


Plaque commemorating first shipment of black cattle from Scotland in 1824, Bothwell

Plaque commemorating first shipment of black cattle from Scotland in 1824, Bothwell

Last night we had very generous Lamb Shanks and beef Schnitzel at the Castle Hotel, one of Australia's oldest hotels with a continuous licence since 1829.
Castle Hotel 1829 Bothwell

Castle Hotel 1829 Bothwell

This afternoon we drove out to the Nant Distillery. The property was settled in 1821 and buildings date from that year. The newer building that forms part of the restaurant dates from 1857.
Nant Distillery  - property settled 1821

Nant Distillery - property settled 1821


Nant Distillery - property settled 1821

Nant Distillery - property settled 1821


Nant Distillery - property settled 1821

Nant Distillery - property settled 1821


Nant Distillery restaurant - property settled 1821

Nant Distillery restaurant - property settled 1821


Nant Distillery - property settled 1821

Nant Distillery - property settled 1821

I recognised a Bentley parked in a shed at Nant. It was brought to Tasmania for Princess Mary's visit to Tasmania and was the vehicle used previously by GG Quentin Bryce.
image

image

In the morning we are travelling to Oatlands (about 80km north of Hobart on the Midland Highway) to have lunch with Kerry and Marie and then drive up to Launceston.

Posted by Kangatraveller 22:00 Archived in Australia

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