A Travellerspoint blog

WEEK 10 - HUONVILLE to BRUNY ISLAND

Tahune Forest Air Walk, Huon Jet and plenty of sunshine

After leaving Cockle Creek on Saturday morning we drove through Geeveston to travel the 29km to the Tahune Forest Airwalk. On the way, we stopped at the Lookin Lookout, a rather unusual display of old forestry equipment set up so that people could be on the lookout for items such as steel shovels etc between the two displays of an old steam engine and a train that ran its steel wheels along very straight logs.
Lookin Lookout on way to Tahune Air walk

Lookin Lookout on way to Tahune Air walk


Old logging winch at Lookin Lookout

Old logging winch at Lookin Lookout


Old logging train running on log rails at Lookin Lookout

Old logging train running on log rails at Lookin Lookout

Sunday morning delivered fine weather and sunshine at the Tahune Forest Airwalk. We woke early as we stayed the night at the centre and went on the Huon Trail walk. On the way we stopped at the ruins of McPartlans House. He was a policeman who hunted down escapee convicts and also kept order in the forestry and mining camps.
Our camp site at Tahune Forest Air Walk

Our camp site at Tahune Forest Air Walk


Huon Trail Walk we did at 7.30am

Huon Trail Walk we did at 7.30am


Ruins of McPartlan's House

Ruins of McPartlan's House


Ruins of McPartlan's House

Ruins of McPartlan's House

Further on the walk we came to the Suspension Bridges across the Huon River.
Suspension Bridges over the Huon River

Suspension Bridges over the Huon River

When the centre opened at 9.00am, we took the trail up to the Tahune Airwalk. Tahune Airwalk is a Forestry Tasmania-owned and operated tourist attraction in Tasmania. Located 70 km south of the capital Hobart in the Huon Valley on the Huon River banks, the airwalk offers an aerial view of the state's southern forests.The treetop walk overlooks the Huon River. The swinging bridges crosses the Huon River.

The walkway is a level steel structure that is suspended over the treetops, as high as 45 metres in places. It is 620 metres long, 1.6 kilometres including the access paths and 112 steps. and is a level structure with a steel walkway. The cantilever on the end holds 10 tonnes which is equivalent to 120 crowded people or ten baby elephants.
Tahune Forest Air Walk Centre

Tahune Forest Air Walk Centre


Beginning of Tahune Forest Air Walk

Beginning of Tahune Forest Air Walk


Walk up to the Tahune Air Walk (5)

Walk up to the Tahune Air Walk (5)


Crossing over the Huon River at Tahune Forest

Crossing over the Huon River at Tahune Forest


Huon River

Huon River


Huon River

Huon River


Tahune Air Walk

Tahune Air Walk


The Wishing Tree on The Tahune Forest Air Walk

The Wishing Tree on The Tahune Forest Air Walk


Cantilever near the confluence of the Huon and Picton Rivers on The Tahune Forest Air Walk

Cantilever near the confluence of the Huon and Picton Rivers on The Tahune Forest Air Walk


On the cantilever of the Tahune Air Walk

On the cantilever of the Tahune Air Walk


Did you know signage at the Tahune Forest Airwalk

Did you know signage at the Tahune Forest Airwalk

We left the Tahune Forest via Geeveston and drove the 50km to Huonville on the Huon River. We spent considerable time at the car wash getting the Cruiser and Quantum back to shiny newness,Wood sculptures at Geeveston

Wood sculptures at Geeveston


After pic of a clean Toyota and Quantum after car washing at Huonville

After pic of a clean Toyota and Quantum after car washing at Huonville

On Monday morning we went on the Huon Jet Boat. The boats are powered by Marinised 5.7 litre fuel injected V8 Chevrolet engines which drive a 8 inch Hamilton Jet water jet unit. This combination can propel the loaded vessel along at speeds of up to 80 kph in water only 100mm deep and allow the vessel to be turned in its own length.
Huon Jet Boat 5.6m powered by a 5.7 V8 Chev motor

Huon Jet Boat 5.6m powered by a 5.7 V8 Chev motor


Colleen at the Huon Jet Boat

Colleen at the Huon Jet Boat

Our ride 12km up the river saw the boat weaving in and out fallen logs and forest canopy overhanging the banks. There are stands of Huon pines along the banks. We turned around near a little township called Glen Huon. Up and down the river we had the thrill of 360 degree turns at high speed. Down near the bridge in Huonville we stopped to see an Eastern Osprey up in the tallest branches.
Huon River on Huon Jet Boat ride

Huon River on Huon Jet Boat ride


Huon River on Huon Jet Boat ride

Huon River on Huon Jet Boat ride


Huon River on Huon Jet Boat ride

Huon River on Huon Jet Boat ride


Huon River on Huon Jet Boat ride

Huon River on Huon Jet Boat ride


Glen Huon up the Huon River

Glen Huon up the Huon River


Glen Huon

Glen Huon


Fly fishermen on the Huon River on Huon Jet Boat ride

Fly fishermen on the Huon River on Huon Jet Boat ride


Mushroom Farm on the banks of the Huon River

Mushroom Farm on the banks of the Huon River


Eastern Osprey in tree on the Huon River

Eastern Osprey in tree on the Huon River

Tuesday morning we left Huonville for Bruny Island. We took the long way around through the coastline Cygnet and stopped at a beautiful beach called Verona Sands.
Verona Sands Beach

Verona Sands Beach


Eggs and Bacon Bay

Eggs and Bacon Bay


View from The Neck Campground, Bruny Island

View from The Neck Campground, Bruny Island

Our camp for the night was to be on the Gordon foreshore fronting the D'Entrecasteau Passage. At the last minute we decided to catch the ferry across at Kettering. The Murambeena is the only way to travel by vehicle to the island. When we arrived we stopped at the get Schucked Oyster Farm ($8 a dozen for live oysters or $13 a dozen for Schucked oysters - I now have a proper shucking knife to use instead of my trusty Leatherman) and the Bruny Island Cheese Company.
Penguin Rookery at The Neck Bruny Island

Penguin Rookery at The Neck Bruny Island

We stayed at the Neck Campground for three nights. This is a beautiful area and it was even better when it wasn't raining. A school or church camping group was learning to surf on the Neck Beach.
Campground at the Neck

Campground at the Neck


Bird pecking our mirror at The Neck

Bird pecking our mirror at The Neck


The Neck Beach looking south

The Neck Beach looking south


The neck beach

The neck beach


Surfing Tassie style at the Neck Beach

Surfing Tassie style at the Neck Beach

On our last day we drove down to Adventure Bay to see the Captain Cook Monument. Captain James Cook landed here in the Resolution on 26 January 1777. Captain Furneaux also landed here 4 years earlier in 1773 but did not claim the land in the name of the French King.
Captain Cook Memorial Adventure Bay South Bruny Island

Captain Cook Memorial Adventure Bay South Bruny Island


Captain Cook Memorial Adventure Bay South Bruny Island

Captain Cook Memorial Adventure Bay South Bruny Island


Adventure Bay South Bruny Island

Adventure Bay South Bruny Island

We visited the little townships of Alonnah and Lunnawanna and then drove the reasonable gravel roads down to Cape Bruny to the National Park and the Lighthouse. The lighthouse was built by convicts in 1827 and was decommissioned in 1996.
Barkers Beach, South Bruny

Barkers Beach, South Bruny


Mabel Bay, South Bruny

Mabel Bay, South Bruny


Cloudy Bay from Bruny Island Lighthouse

Cloudy Bay from Bruny Island Lighthouse


Cape Bruny Lighthouse

Cape Bruny Lighthouse


Cape Bruny Lighthouse

Cape Bruny Lighthouse


David at Bruny Island Lighthouse

David at Bruny Island Lighthouse


Bruny Island Lighthouse

Bruny Island Lighthouse

Before we left the island we had to go past the get Shucked Oyster Farm again so we replenished the oysters again.
Waiting for service at the Get Shucked Oyster Farm at Bruny Island

Waiting for service at the Get Shucked Oyster Farm at Bruny Island

We drove back to Hobart through beautiful little towns like Snug and then travelled to a place called Campania just north of Richmond for our next camp. This little place is in the Coal River Valley noted for its Wineries, vineyards, AND CHERRIES!!!!

Posted by Kangatraveller 16:51

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