A Travellerspoint blog

By this Author: Kangatraveller

WEEK 17 - Farewell to Tassie

Last week in Tasmania and farewell to this Blog

We had a wonderful lunch at Rosevears Tavern last Sunday. There has been a tavern there since 1831. The present building was built there in 1939 following a devastating fire in the previous tavern.This is how some people arrived for lunch at Rosevears

This is how some people arrived for lunch at Rosevears

Before lunch we had a tasting at a nearby winery called Tamar Ridge.
Tamar Ridge Winery bought by Brown Brothers in 2010

Tamar Ridge Winery bought by Brown Brothers in 2010


View from Tamar Ridge

View from Tamar Ridge


View from Tamar Ridge

View from Tamar Ridge


Grindelwald Holiday Village - Swiss theme resort on the West Tamar

Grindelwald Holiday Village - Swiss theme resort on the West Tamar

We returned to Launceston for Colleen to fly to Melbourne for the Final Five at the Australian Open and for me to bring the Landcruiser and Quantum back on the Spirit of Tasmania on Sunday 26 January. We would then take the Newell Highway back through New South Wales to return to Brisbane on Thursday 30th January.

Tasmania has been a great place to visit and to tour Round for three and a half months has been a real pleasure (except for some pretty ordinary weather for the first month or two).

Some of our favourite places have been around the north west, particularly the Arthur River and the Wild West Coast, Southern Tasmania around Hobart and the Huon River are very pretty.

Here are a few panoramas to finish this last entry in our blog. We hope you have enjoyed some of the beauty of this part if the world.
Thanks for reading our blog. This is the end. We will blog again in August when we travel to Europe for four months. CND
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Posted by Kangatraveller 19:35 Comments (1)

WEEK 16 - Cradle Mountain and the central north

Mole Creek, Cradle Mountain and Narawntapu National Park

With beautiful weather forecasted we left Launceston early on Sunday morning for a breakfast at the Bakery Cafe at Elizabeth Town. Our first stop was at Railton, a little town about 10km from Sheffield which is about 30km south of Devonport.

Here are some pics of the topiaries at Railton. There were literally hundreds of these in and around the Main Street.
Railton - Topiary Town

Railton - Topiary Town


Railton - Topiary Town

Railton - Topiary Town


Railton - Topiary Town

Railton - Topiary Town


Railton - Topiary Town

Railton - Topiary Town

A stop at Sheffield is a must as there are many beautiful murals in the town. People say there are fifty five murals. It is a lovely little town and we knew we would stop again for two nights later in the week.
Sheffield - Mural Town with 50 murals

Sheffield - Mural Town with 50 murals

Sheffield - Mural Town with 50 murals

Sheffield - Mural Town with 50 murals

Sheffield - Mural Town with 50 murals

Sheffield - Mural Town with 50 murals

Sheffield - Mural Town with 50 murals

Sheffield - Mural Town with 50 murals

Our first two nights saw us camping at Lake Parangana. The lake was formed by a dam across the Mersey River. We stopped at Round Mountain lookout along the way to take in breathtaking views. The roads around here are narrow, winding and quite steep......and seem to have their share of rentals with drivers who are not sure which side of the road is their side.
Mersey Valley Olivers Road Scenic Lookout scene

Mersey Valley Olivers Road Scenic Lookout scene


Lake Parangana

Lake Parangana

Our campsite at Lake Parangana

Our campsite at Lake Parangana

Dam wall at Lake Parangana

Dam wall at Lake Parangana

We travelled on to the Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park. The day turned out to be the hottest day we have experienced in Tasmania. We took the shuttle bus from the Visitors Centre to Dove Lake to do the circuit around the lake.
Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park entrance

Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park entrance


Car park for caravans at Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park

Car park for caravans at Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park


Shuttle buses at Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park

Shuttle buses at Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park


Visitors Centre at Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park

Visitors Centre at Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park


Cradle Mountain with Dove Lake in foreground

Cradle Mountain with Dove Lake in foreground


Walk around Dove Lake

Walk around Dove Lake


Cradle Mountain with Dove Lake in foreground

Cradle Mountain with Dove Lake in foreground

After our two days at Lake Parangana we drove back to Sheffield to spend two nights in an RV stop at the Cricket Club. This type of stop is for self contained vehicles only.

On Thursday we drove to Devonport and then on to Narawntapu National Park where we stayed the night at Bakers Beach campground.
Bakers Beach campground at Narawntapu National Park

Bakers Beach campground at Narawntapu National Park

Bakers Beach at Narawntapu National Park

Bakers Beach at Narawntapu National Park

Friday was a short driving morning across to the West Tamar to Beaconsfield and then north to Greens Beach and back to Kelso Sands Tourist Park. This spot was to be our campsite for the next two nights. it was in a lovely landscaped bush setting on the west bank of the Tamar River. From here we went to places such as Beauty Point and then across the Batman Bridge up the east side of the river to Georgetown and Low Head.
Beaconsfield Museum of Mines

Beaconsfield Museum of Mines

Beaconsfield Museum of Mines

Beaconsfield Museum of Mines

This photo below commemorates Beaconsfield being the first community in Australia to fluoridate their water supply.

Beaconsfield Museum of Mines

Beaconsfield Museum of Mines

Marina at Beauty Point

Marina at Beauty Point


Tamar River at Beauty Point

Tamar River at Beauty Point

Greens Beach on west side of mouth of the Tamar River

Greens Beach on west side of mouth of the Tamar River

A rather different type of excursion for us was to visit Sea Horse World at Beauty Point. We actually found it interesting and probably know more about sea horses than we really wanted to.

Beauty Point - Seahorse World with Platypus World in background

Beauty Point - Seahorse World with Platypus World in background


Sea Horse World at Beauty Point

Sea Horse World at Beauty Point

Sea Horse World at Beauty Point

Sea Horse World at Beauty Point

Sea Horse World at Beauty Point - Giant Crab

Sea Horse World at Beauty Point - Giant Crab


Sea Horse World at Beauty Point

Sea Horse World at Beauty Point


We crossed the Batman Bridge to East Tamar and then on up to George Town and Low Head.
Batman Bridge across the Tamar River

Batman Bridge across the Tamar River

Low Head Lighthouse

Low Head Lighthouse

Low Head Lighthouse

Low Head Lighthouse

Signage at Low Head Lighthouse

Signage at Low Head Lighthouse

On our way back to Kelso Sands Tourist Park we had a brief stop at York Town, the first permanent settlement in northern Tasmania. There is very little left of this settlement which was short lived before it was moved to Launceston.
Signage at York Town - first permanent settlement in northern Tasmania

Signage at York Town - first permanent settlement in northern Tasmania


York Town - first permanent settlement in northern Tasmania

York Town - first permanent settlement in northern Tasmania


York Town - first permanent settlement in northern Tasmania

York Town - first permanent settlement in northern Tasmania

Kelso Sands on west bank of the Tamar River looking across to George Town

Kelso Sands on west bank of the Tamar River looking across to George Town

Tomorrow, we move back to Launceston for our last week in Tasmania.

Posted by Kangatraveller 22:24 Comments (0)

WEEK 15 - Friendly Beaches and the Freycinet Peninsula

Farewell to Hobart and hello to the East Coast

This morning we left Campania for the Tasman Highway to Triabunna then further north to Swansea and Freycinet. We had a short stop in Triabunna before turning north to Friendly Beaches on the Freycinet Peninsula.

On the way north we stopped at Spiky Beach and the Spiky bridge just south of Swansea. The Spiky Bridge is part of the old convict coach road that connected Swansea with Little Swanport and the east coast road to Hobart. It sits beside the current east coast highway, approx 7kms south of Swansea.
Spiky Bridge built by convicts - south of Swansea

Spiky Bridge built by convicts - south of Swansea


Spiky beach - south of Swansea

Spiky beach - south of Swansea

By the 1820’s the reaches of white settlement were being pushed further up Tasmania’s east coast. Settlers such as George Meredith and Francis Cotton, were drawn to the area by the prospects of farming and whaling. Despite constant complaints from the settlers to the Government regarding the lack of road access, by 1840 there was still no road between Little Swanport and the Swansea district. At Rocky Hills Probation Station, the convicts were primarily employed on road works in the area, as well as clearing land and constructing station buildings. The Spiky Bridge and parts of the old coach road which are still visible today, remain enduring legacies of the convict workers from this station.

The jagged rocks used to ornament the bridge provided the bridge's name. Built in 1843, it has been claimed that the spikes were designed to prevent cattle falling over the sides.

While we were in Swansea we looked out for my brother Paul's old holiday house, Scarecrow Cottage. We found the current owners had communicated with a ghost, believed to be William Fogarty, the original builder of this stone cottage.
Scarecrow Cottage - 22 Noyes Street, Swansea

Scarecrow Cottage - 22 Noyes Street, Swansea

We had lunch at the Bark Tavern, Museum and Bakery. I believe their Steak and Pepper pies were arguably the best I had ever eaten.
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Picture below is our campsite at Friendly Beaches. This is a national park and proved to be very popular with campers. Toilets and campsites only were provided. Our first day was rather overcast and cold but the next two days were quite sunny and warm.
Our campsite at Friendly Beaches, Freycinet National Park

Our campsite at Friendly Beaches, Freycinet National Park


campsites at Friendly Beaches, Freycinet National Park

campsites at Friendly Beaches, Freycinet National Park


Bennetts wallabies at our campsite at Friendly Beaches, Freycinet National Park

Bennetts wallabies at our campsite at Friendly Beaches, Freycinet National Park


7.30am  Friendly Beaches, Freycinet National Park

7.30am Friendly Beaches, Freycinet National Park


7.30am  Friendly Beaches, Freycinet National Park

7.30am Friendly Beaches, Freycinet National Park


Friendly Beaches from The Lookout

Friendly Beaches from The Lookout


Friendly Beaches, Freycinet Peninsula looking east

Friendly Beaches, Freycinet Peninsula looking east


Friendly Beaches, Freycinet Peninsula looking north

Friendly Beaches, Freycinet Peninsula looking north


Friendly Beaches, Freycinet Peninsula looking north

Friendly Beaches, Freycinet Peninsula looking north


Friendly Beaches, Freycinet Peninsula looking south

Friendly Beaches, Freycinet Peninsula looking south


Panorama of Friendly Beaches, Freycinet Peninsula looking north

Panorama of Friendly Beaches, Freycinet Peninsula looking north

We went down to Coles Bay to see The Hazzards, the majestic bare rocky outcrops and mountains that frame Coles Bay. We enjoyed Sleepy Bay and the beaches to the north of Coles Bay. In particular, the Oyster Farm was a highlight for me.
Sleepy Bay, Freycinet Peninsula with Wineglass Bay to the right

Sleepy Bay, Freycinet Peninsula with Wineglass Bay to the right


Sleepy Bay, Freycinet Peninsula

Sleepy Bay, Freycinet Peninsula


Sleepy Bay, Freycinet Peninsula

Sleepy Bay, Freycinet Peninsula


View from beach south of Cole Bay with The Hazzards in the background

View from beach south of Cole Bay with The Hazzards in the background


Coles Bay, Freycinet Peninsula

Coles Bay, Freycinet Peninsula


Coles Bay, Freycinet Peninsula

Coles Bay, Freycinet Peninsula


Coles Bay with The Hazzards in the background

Coles Bay with The Hazzards in the background


View from beach south of Cole Bay with The Hazzards in the background

View from beach south of Cole Bay with The Hazzards in the background

On Wednesday, we broke camp and headed north to St Helens. On the way we stopped at Bicheno to see the Blow Hole. We were able to buy some very nice Blue Eyed Trevalla at The Gultch at a seafood place.
The Blow Hole at Bicheno

The Blow Hole at Bicheno


The Blow Hole at Bicheno

The Blow Hole at Bicheno


The Gultch at Bicheno

The Gultch at Bicheno


Panorama of The Blow Hole at Bio

Panorama of The Blow Hole at Bio

I went out fishing with Michael of Gone Fishing along with a grandfather, son and grandson at Ansons Bay, St Helens on Thursday. We had a wonderful three hours of fishing. we went out in a six metre boat with a 150 HP outboard (Michael said to hang on as he had 150 horses and he used every one). between us we caught about sixty fish of 14 different species. Here are a few photos.
Gone fishing boat at St Helens

Gone fishing boat at St Helens

Fishing at Anson Bay, St Helens

Fishing at Anson Bay, St Helens

Mackrel caught by David at St Helens

Mackrel caught by David at St Helens

Yellow Eye caught by David at St Helens

Yellow Eye caught by David at St Helens

Michael Haley of Gone Fishing holding my Yellow Eye

Michael Haley of Gone Fishing holding my Yellow Eye

Salmon jumping at St Helens

Salmon jumping at St Helens

We arrived back in Launceston yesterday for two days to help Paul celebrate his birthday? Our final road trip in Tasmania would be the central north with visits to Mole Creek, Cradle Mountain, Burnie, Port Sorell and the Narawntapu National Park.

Posted by Kangatraveller 19:02 Comments (0)

WEEK 14 - HOBART

Eight days in Hobart - a town of all seasons

Our first day in Hobart was characterised by a warm, sunny day (with a small shower) and absolutely fierce winds. Wild Oats X1 was the first boat in from the Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race and line honours winner for the seventh time.

We went down to Constitution Dock to see the boats on Sunday morning. Wild Oats X1 was tied up with the crew stowing gear and the Captain, Mark Richards on his iPhone. We walked around the marina to see the other boats. The other 100 footers, Loyal Perpetual and Ragamuffin were receiving similar treatment and interest from a large crowd. Syd Fischer, the 86 year old skipper of Ragamuffin was on deck early and looking at the other yachts before returning to his own boat.
Mawson Place, Hobart

Mawson Place, Hobart


The line honours winner skipper Mark Richards texting

The line honours winner skipper Mark Richards texting


Wild Oats at Constitution Dock

Wild Oats at Constitution Dock


Wild Oats at Constitution Dock

Wild Oats at Constitution Dock


Loyal, second in line honours of Sydney to Hobart Yacht race

Loyal, second in line honours of Sydney to Hobart Yacht race


Ragamuffin

Ragamuffin


Ragamuffin

Ragamuffin

Syd Fischer and skipper at 86, owner of Ragamuffin

Syd Fischer and skipper at 86, owner of Ragamuffin


Nikata at finish line of Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race

Nikata at finish line of Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race


Yachts in the Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race

Yachts in the Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race

We had lunch at Daci & Daci Bakery and then decided we should go to the Taste of Tasmania site. We knew we shouldn't have had lunch earlier when we walked into The Shed as there were stalls with a huge variety of foods, beers, wines and ciders. It was very hard to know where to start. We decided then that we should return the next day.
Crowds in the shed at Taste of Tasmania

Crowds in the shed at Taste of Tasmania


Crowds in the shed at Taste of Tasmania

Crowds in the shed at Taste of Tasmania


Taste of Tasmania

Taste of Tasmania


Taste of Tasmania

Taste of Tasmania

NOMA
The Museum of Old and New Art (MONA) is an art museum located within the Moorilla winery on the Berriedale peninsula in Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. It is the largest privately funded museum in Australia. The museum presents antiquities, modern and contemporary art from the David Walsh collection. Walsh has described the museum as a "subversive adult Disneyland."

MONA was officially opened on 21 January 2011. Along with its frequently updated indoor collection, MONA also hosts the annual MOFO and Dark Mofo festivals which showcase large-scale public art and live performances.

The single-story MONA building appears at street level to be dominated by its surroundings, but its interior possesses a spiral staircase that leads down to three larger levels of labryrinthine display spaces built into the side of the cliffs around Berriedale peninsula. The building is largely underground. Most visitors approach by ferry up the River Derwent. There are no windows and the atmosphere is intentionally ominous. On entering the museum, visitors descend a "seemingly endless flight of stairs", an experience one critic compared with "going down into Petra".

Fortunately there is a lift operating for those who don't want to use the stairs.

MONA - Museum of Old and New Art

MONA - Museum of Old and New Art


Mona Roma, the Catamaran that runs from Brooke Street Pier to MONA near cruise ship Diamond Princess

Mona Roma, the Catamaran that runs from Brooke Street Pier to MONA near cruise ship Diamond Princess

Road into MONA also Moorilla Vineyards

Road into MONA also Moorilla Vineyards

Top entrance to MONA

Top entrance to MONA


MONA - top deck with wire cement truck in background

MONA - top deck with wire cement truck in background


MONA - entrance to The Source Restaurant

MONA - entrance to The Source Restaurant


Grounds of MONA

Grounds of MONA


Moorilla Vineyards

Moorilla Vineyards


Mt Wellington - view from MONA

Mt Wellington - view from MONA


MONA - view from B2

MONA - view from B2


The Boss's Car Park

The Boss's Car Park


The Boss's wife's car park

The Boss's wife's car park

Here are some of the art works we enjoyed or were intrigued by.

MONA - B1 gallery

MONA - B1 gallery


MONA - Bit. Fall

MONA - Bit. Fall


MONA - Kuba - a large room with many tv's  running short films (no two TVs or chairs the same)

MONA - Kuba - a large room with many tv's running short films (no two TVs or chairs the same)


MON A - In the Realms of the Unreal by Darger

MON A - In the Realms of the Unreal by Darger


MONA - 2500 year old bead covering for a mummy

MONA - 2500 year old bead covering for a mummy

MONA - Queensland artist Tracey Moffat's Something More

MONA - Queensland artist Tracey Moffat's Something More


MONA - The Berlin Buddha

MONA - The Berlin Buddha


MONA - The Bit Code

MONA - The Bit Code

MONA - The Fat Car

MONA - The Fat Car


MONA - The Palace Door

MONA - The Palace Door

MONA - The Pulse Room

MONA - The Pulse Room


MONA - The Subjectivisation of Repetition

MONA - The Subjectivisation of Repetition


MONA - The Wind Section Instrumental

MONA - The Wind Section Instrumental

Modern art is meant to stimulate discussion and thought, to provoke and sometimes outrage us. Here are two pieces that do exactly that.

MONA - Pupa

MONA - Pupa


MONA - The Arse End of the World

MONA - The Arse End of the World

On Friday we went for a drive to South Arm and Opossum Beach for a drive as this was one small part of the peninsulas around Hobart that we hadn't seen. It was also in the general direction of Barilla Bay Oysters. Opossum bay is a town on the South Arm peninsula south of Hobart. The eastern side of the peninsula is Storm Bay.
Panorama of Opossum Bay Beach

Panorama of Opossum Bay Beach


Opossum Bay Beach

Opossum Bay Beach


Opossum Bay Beach

Opossum Bay Beach


Opossum Bay Beach

Opossum Bay Beach

Opossum Bay with Kingston on the other side of the channel leading to the mouth of the Derwent River

Opossum Bay with Kingston on the other side of the channel leading to the mouth of the Derwent River

On Saturday we headed off to Campania , just a short drive away for a night of free camping. On the way we stopped off for freshly picked roadside cherries and a call into the historic town of Richmond for coffee. We enjoyed our stay in Hobart but were glad to leave some of the windy days behind us and move on up the east coast to the Freycinet Peninsula and our next stop at Friendly Beaches. Our plan was to be back in Launceston on 10 January for my brother Paul's birthday.

Posted by Kangatraveller 19:54 Comments (0)

WEEK 13- Christmas in Launceston and back to HOBART

Salamanca Markets and the next week in Hobart

Our nine days of Christmas in Launceston were very enjoyable. We did absolutely none of the tourist things. It was a period of catch up, good food, good company and a small amount of concentration on avoiding the excesses of Christmas.

We headed back to Hobart on the 27th December to pick up our Quantum from storage at the Treasure Island Caravan Park and set up again for our stay over the next eight days. The best part about being grey nomads is that we only require vague plans of what we were going to do. Top of our list were: Salamanca Markets (Saturdays only), The Taste Festival, MONA (The Museum OF New and Old Art) and the usual tourist haunts such as Battery Point, Mt Wellington and a city tour.

On Saturday morning we went to the Salamanca Markets. It was a very pleasant morning with us just strolling around and doing very little shopping.

large_Crowds_at_..ket__Hobart.jpgStall at Salamanca Market, Hobart

Stall at Salamanca Market, Hobart

Salamanca Market near the park

Salamanca Market near the park

Salamanca Market, Hobart

Salamanca Market, Hobart

Saturday Salamanca Market, Hobart

Saturday Salamanca Market, Hobart

Tomorrow we are going down to Constitution Dock to see some of the first boats to arrive from the Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race.

Posted by Kangatraveller 01:28 Comments (0)

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