A Travellerspoint blog

WEEK 7 - Launceston and Arthur River

Return to Launceston

sunny 25 °C

Sunday morning turned out to be a day of beautiful weather in Launceston. We left our camp at Chain of Lagoons the day before as we were running low on power and the weather had taken a turn for worse with constant showers and being cold and wet.

We were due to return to Launceston the day after as Colleen had a dental appointment on the Tuesday and we both wanted to help Paul with preparing his house for sale .A few solid days with "karchering" the house and pathways and being quite brutal in terms of culling excess furniture and the property looked a real treat.

We did have a little time to admire the many beautiful examples of early 1800s architecture around Launceston. Launceston is located on the beautiful Tamar River in northern Tasmania. It's the third oldest city in Australia and has retained much of it stunning architectural heritage.

Old terrace houses in St John Street

Old terrace houses in St John Street


old houses near St Vincents and church clock tower

old houses near St Vincents and church clock tower


Early 1800s St John Street, Launceston

Early 1800s St John Street, Launceston


1800s residences in St John Street, Launceston

1800s residences in St John Street, Launceston


1800s terrace houses in St John Street, Launceston

1800s terrace houses in St John Street, Launceston

Anaethetist - Dr William Pugh, first person to use anaesthetics in the Southern Hemisphere.

William Russ Pugh (1805-1897), medical practitioner, arrived in Hobart Town in the Derwent in December 1835, and reputedly walked soon after to Launceston, where the following May he married a fellow passenger Cornelia Ann, the daughter of G. A. Kirton, a London solicitor.

William Russ Pugh was credited with administering the first surgical anaesthetic in the southern hemisphere. Pugh received instruction in Edinburgh and Dublin, and in 1835 set up practice in Launceston. An enthusiastic experimenter, he produced coal gas to light his house, and the ether for his anaesthetics. On 7 June 1847 he performed two operations at St John's Hospital, removing a tumour from a woman's jaw and cataracts from a man, under ether anaesthesia. That day he wrote an account of the procedures for the Australian Medical Journal.
The picture below show Dr Pugh's former residence.

Anaethetist house in Launceston

Anaethetist house in Launceston

Boags Brewery

Boag's Brewery (J. Boag & Son) is an Australian brewery company founded in 1883 by James Boag and his son, also named James, in Launceston, Tasmania. It is now owned by Lion Nathan Ltd, a Trans-Tasman subsidiary company of Japanese beverage conglomerate, Kirin. All of the company's beers are produced in Launceston.

Boags Beer ad - Born in tasmania, raised all over Australia

Boags Beer ad - Born in tasmania, raised all over Australia


Boags Brewery, Launceston (2)

Boags Brewery, Launceston (2)


Sign on Boags Brewery, Launceston

Sign on Boags Brewery, Launceston


Customs House Mews now luxury units - Everything old is new again.

Customs House Mews now luxury units - Everything old is new again.

Old Post Office

The clock tower is one of the most photographed buildings in the city, and people spoke freely of their affection for it, and its importance to the city.
After the Launceston General Post Office was built in 1889, a group of residents formed The Launceston Clock and Chimes Committee in 1906 to raise funds to extend the tower's height, and install the clock and chimes.

Old Post Office

Old Post Office


Sculptures in Civic square, Launceston

Sculptures in Civic square, Launceston


Town Hall

Town Hall

Central Launceston has many old buildings, in particular bank buildings, which have been given a new lease of life as commercial premises.
Bank of NSW building 1817 (2)

Bank of NSW building 1817 (2)


former bank building with new lease of life in Launceston mall

former bank building with new lease of life in Launceston mall


Crown Milled Rolled Oats and Oatmeal

Crown Milled Rolled Oats and Oatmeal

Albert Hall and the Gatekeepers Cottage

The Albert Hall is a convention centre in Launceston, Tasmania in the style of high Victorian architecture, first opened as the main structure for the Tasmanian Industrial exhibition which ran from 25 November 1891 to 22 March 1892.
Albert Hall

Albert Hall

Next to Albert Hall is Kings Bridge Cottage which is nestled on the edge of a 200 million year old dolerite cliff, overlooking the South Esk River. The cottage was built in the 1890s to house the gatekeeper for the Reserve.
Gamekeepers Cottage in royal Albert Park

Gamekeepers Cottage in royal Albert Park

The Cataract Gorge Reserve covers 192 hectares and is an inspiring place for tourists, artists, nature lovers and the local community. More than 500,000 people visit the iconic location each year to swim, walk, kayak, dine and relax. It has an abundance of flora and fauna, with 25 threatened flora species and seven threatened fauna species. Amazingly, the Gorge is less than one kilometre from the city centre.

Launceston is located on the beautiful Tamar River in northern Tasmania. It's the third oldest city in Australia and has retained much of it stunning architectural heritage.

Inverisk Precinct

The Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery (QVMAG) has a part of the museum located at the Inveresk Precinct. Its other site is at Royal Park and when combined it becomes the largest museum in Australia located out of a capital city. It includes a working planetarium and displays related to Launceston's industrial environments and railway workshops.

Inveresk Precinct, Launceston

Inveresk Precinct, Launceston


Academy of the Arts, Inveresk

Academy of the Arts, Inveresk


Museum at Inveresk - ex Railway workshops

Museum at Inveresk - ex Railway workshops

Friday morning we had finished with tasks in Launceston. We headed north towards Devonport and stopped for an early lunch at the Bakery Café at Elizabeth Town.
Bakery Cafe at Elizabeth Town

Bakery Cafe at Elizabeth Town

We took the Bass highway west along the north coast to Burnie, Wynyard and Stanley. Table Cape is 5km west of Wynyard and is known for the rolling fields of tulips. We saw a few end of season tulips only but the view was worth the visit.
Tulips at Table Cape

Tulips at Table Cape


Panorama from Table Cape Lookout

Panorama from Table Cape Lookout


View from Table Cape

View from Table Cape


View from Table Cape

View from Table Cape


Lighthouse at Table Cape

Lighthouse at Table Cape


Panorama from Table Cape

Panorama from Table Cape

We shad a brief stop at Stanley to take some pictures of The Nut.
Stanley

Stanley


The Nut at Stanley

The Nut at Stanley

We looked at the weather forecasts and it seemed the west coast might have a few days of sunshine so we went to Smithton and then on to Arthur River. We planned to take the gravel road down through the Tarkine but this was not to be. There had been a landslip and the road will be closed for about five months.
The Edge of the World Lookout at Arthur River

The Edge of the World Lookout at Arthur River


The Edge of the World Lookout at Arthur River

The Edge of the World Lookout at Arthur River


The Edge of the World Lookout at Arthur River

The Edge of the World Lookout at Arthur River


Plaque at The Edge of the World Lookout at Arthur River

Plaque at The Edge of the World Lookout at Arthur River


North bank of the Arthur River

North bank of the Arthur River

We stayed at Peppermint Campground in Arthur River. This was a grassy sheltered place right in the middle of this township. We drove to the Edge of the World Lookout on the southern side of Arthur River. On Saturday morning we booked to take the river cruise on the MV George Robinson.
Peppermint Camp Ground, Arthur River

Peppermint Camp Ground, Arthur River


Mouth of the Arthur River

Mouth of the Arthur River


Arthur River

Arthur River


Arthur River, north western Tasmania

Arthur River, north western Tasmania

This morning (Saturday) has been an unbelievably beautiful day starting with a cool morning and some clouds and ending in brilliant sunshine in the mid twenties. We took the Arthur River cruise - five hours up the river including lunch in the Tarkine forest. The Arthur River is pristine as it has never been logged or dammed and the last hot fire to go through was 650 years ago. It is claimed that the Tarkins is the largest remaining Gondwana type forest left in the world.

The Arthur River is very rich in tannins and this brings out beautiful reflections on the mirror like surface.
Mouth of the Arthur River - never logged or dammed - last wild river in Tasmania

Mouth of the Arthur River - never logged or dammed - last wild river in Tasmania


Colleen ready to board the MV George Robinson - 5.5m boat designed on last century river boat

Colleen ready to board the MV George Robinson - 5.5m boat designed on last century river boat


Arthur River

Arthur River


Reflections on the Arthur River

Reflections on the Arthur River

The Tarkine - rainforest ferns Arthur River

The Tarkine - rainforest ferns Arthur River

The Tarkine - hardwoods are very slow to rot - may take hundreds of years

The Tarkine - hardwoods are very slow to rot - may take hundreds of years

Arthur River is rich in tannins that help reflect surrounding landscape

Arthur River is rich in tannins that help reflect surrounding landscape

Reflections on the Arthur River

Reflections on the Arthur River


Lunch camp BBQ - 14km up the Arthur River

Lunch camp BBQ - 14km up the Arthur River

Pademelon and Joey at our lunch camp 14km up the Arthur River

Pademelon and Joey at our lunch camp 14km up the Arthur River

White breasted sea eagle high up in tree

White breasted sea eagle high up in tree

Sea eagle  on the Arthur River

Sea eagle on the Arthur River

White breasted sea eagle seizing fish from the river

White breasted sea eagle seizing fish from the river

in the morning we plan to drive back up through Smithton and then to Burnis and down to the middle of the west coast to Strahan for a few days.

Posted by Kangatraveller 22:51 Archived in Australia Comments (0)

WEEK 6 - BINALONG BAY TO CHAIN OF LAGOONS BEACH

St Helens, Swimcart Beach, Chain of Lagoons Beach and back to Launceston.

Friday night we camped just to the north of St Helens at Moulting Bay. This was a very pleasant spot with just a few neighbours.
Moulting Bay campsite

Moulting Bay campsite


Moulting Bay

Moulting Bay

We went for a drive up to The Gardens, north of Binalong bay.
Panorama View from the Gardens

Panorama View from the Gardens


View from the Gardens

View from the Gardens

Saturday afternoon saw us at the Big 4 Caravan Park for two nights to allow us time to do some of the necessities of camping life - empty the black water tanks, fill up on water, shop for supplies and have some short drives around the area .
St Helens marina

St Helens marina


Georges Bay, St Helens

Georges Bay, St Helens


Georges Bay, St Helens

Georges Bay, St Helens


Burns Bay, St Helens Point

Burns Bay, St Helens Point


Burns Bay, St Helens Point

Burns Bay, St Helens Point


Burns Bay, St Helens Point

Burns Bay, St Helens Point


Wildlife at St Helens Holiday Village

Wildlife at St Helens Holiday Village

At the park, we saw another couple with a Quantum. Bruce and Lyn from Samford. We exchanges stories and places we were impressed with. They were heading for Waterhouse Point, our last destination, the next morning. We picked up some very good tips from them as they have had their Quantum for four years.

On Monday morning, we packed up and left for Swimcart Beach some 15km to the north on Binalong Bay. We stopped at Lease 65 just north of St Helens for some oysters. Freshly harvested large Pacific oysters were $8 a dozen.

We camped right on the beachfront with only about 5 metres to get onto the beach. Here are some pictures. One morning, Colleen called out to tell me there was a snake outside. I found two Slimy Skinks either copulating or fighting. For the sake of propriety, let's say they were fighting over territory.
Swimcart Beach, Binalong Bay

Swimcart Beach, Binalong Bay


Our campsite between the road and the beach

Our campsite between the road and the beach


Swimcart Beach

Swimcart Beach


Swimcart Beach, Binalong Bay

Swimcart Beach, Binalong Bay


Swimcart beach from our campsite at noon

Swimcart beach from our campsite at noon


Swimcart beach at dawn

Swimcart beach at dawn


Swimcart beach at dawn

Swimcart beach at dawn


Slimy Skinks fighting!!!

Slimy Skinks fighting!!!

The top end of Swimcart Beach is Cosy Corner South with a beautiful beach stretching north to Cosy Corner North. It was an easy walk up to the rocks then around to Cosy Corner.
Rocks at Cosy Corner South

Rocks at Cosy Corner South


Rocks at Cosy Corner South

Rocks at Cosy Corner South


Swimcart Beach from Cosy Corner South

Swimcart Beach from Cosy Corner South


Flowers on dune

Flowers on dune


Beach between Cosy Corner North and South

Beach between Cosy Corner North and South

We left Swimcart Beach a day early when the wind picked up and the weather turned blustery with showers. We went through to Chain of Lagoons Beach to camp for a few days. This was another beautiful camping spot except for the rain setting in.
Chain of Lagoons Beach  - lagoon

Chain of Lagoons Beach - lagoon


Chain of Lagoons Beach campsites

Chain of Lagoons Beach campsites


Chain of Lagoons Beach campsites

Chain of Lagoons Beach campsites


Chain of Lagoons Beach

Chain of Lagoons Beach


Chain of Lagoons Beach

Chain of Lagoons Beach

Our solar continued to recharge the batteries but at a very much slower rate. With the prospect of more rainy weather we decided to head back to Launceston on Saturday morning.

St Marys

St Marys


St Marys

St Marys


Scenery between St Marys and Fingal

Scenery between St Marys and Fingal

We had lunch at Perth, a little place south of Launceston.
Scene south of Perth

Scene south of Perth

We stopped at Franklin House just south of Launceston. Franklin House in Tasmania, Australia is a historic house that is preserved by Australia's National Trust. It was built of Australian cedar. It is a Georgian style house that was built in 1838 for Britton Jones, a Launceston brewer and innkeeper. It was later a school for boys. The house and gardens are located in Franklin Village, Tasmania
Franklin House, Launceston

Franklin House, Launceston

Most of the next week will be spent in Launceston with Colleen looking forward to root canal and both of us helping Paul with selling his house.

Posted by Kangatraveller 00:12 Comments (0)

WEEK 5 - Launceston to St Helens

Waterhouse Conservation Area and Mt William National Park

This is living the dream. Early on Monday morning we picked up our caravan at Treasure Island Caravan Park and headed north east on the Tasman Highway to Scottsdale. The Tasman Highway heads east from Launceston through Scottsdale to St Helens on the east coast. We headed north from Scottsdale to travel to Bridport. We were going to stop in Scottsdale for fresh bread but decided to leave it until Bridport. Yes, Bridport has a bakery but it does not open on Mondays. The next best thing was the IGA next door for bread and hot chicken for lunch.
Scene Launceston to Scottsdale

Scene Launceston to Scottsdale

]Scene Launceston to Scottsdale

Scene Launceston to Scottsdale


Panorama Lookout near Scottsdale

Panorama Lookout near Scottsdale


Lookout near Scottsdale

Lookout near Scottsdale


Wood carvings near Scottsdale

Wood carvings near Scottsdale

Bridport is a little fishing village with basic services. After lunch in the park we drove north east to Waterhouse Point Conservation Area. We camped at The Village Green at Waterhouse Point for two nights and after the wind blew in on Wednesday morning we decided to move on to a more sheltered camp site. We were sorry to leave here as we almost had the place to ourselves with only one other campervan whose occupants were rarely seen. Our campsite was a short walk to the beach and had an added bonus of a beautiful piece of carpet like grass.
Bridport

Bridport


Waterhouse Point Conservation Area

Waterhouse Point Conservation Area


Waterhouse Conservation Area

Waterhouse Conservation Area


Beach at Village Green, Waterhouse Conservation Area

Beach at Village Green, Waterhouse Conservation Area


Bird on Beach at Waterhouse Point

Bird on Beach at Waterhouse Point


Flower on Beach at Village Green, Waterhouse Conservation Area

Flower on Beach at Village Green, Waterhouse Conservation Area


Panorama Beach at Village Green, Waterhouse Conservation Area

Panorama Beach at Village Green, Waterhouse Conservation Area


Scene leaving Waterhouse Point Conservation Area

Scene leaving Waterhouse Point Conservation Area


Village Green Waterhouse Point

Village Green Waterhouse Point


Tuesday sunset at Waterhouse Point

Tuesday sunset at Waterhouse Point


Tree sheltering behind rock at Beach at Village Green, Waterhouse Conservation Area

Tree sheltering behind rock at Beach at Village Green, Waterhouse Conservation Area


native orchid

native orchid


Panorama  on Wednesday - Beach at Village Green, Waterhouse Conservation Area

Panorama on Wednesday - Beach at Village Green, Waterhouse Conservation Area

Wednesday morning we headed east to a little township named Gladstone. This little place is the gateway to Mt William National Park. Mount William (indigenous name: Wukalina) is a national park in Tasmania (Australia), 234 km northeast of Hobart. Established in 1973 as a 8,640 hectares large national park, it has been expanded multiple times, reaching 13,806 ha in 1980 and 18,439 ha in 1999.

The park provides protected habitat to eastern grey kangarooes, wombats, Bennetts wallabies, Tasmanian pademelons, echidnas, brush-tailed possums and Tasmanian devils.

Mount William National Park on Tasmania's far north-east coast is remote with undulating grasslands, large dunes, sweeping white beaches and an ocean varying from azure in the shallows to bright blue in deeper waters. The granite boulders in the surf zone are home to many sea birds like cormorants, terns and pelicans. We were to camp at Top Camp which is an oceanfront campsite on the beach between Musselroe Bay and Cape Naturaliste. This was on a very beautiful beach. As we drove in we noticed there were nearby windfarms. A lady out walking her dog suggested Stumpy Bay just south of Cape Naturaliste as a more protected campsite.

There are five camping areas along Stumpy Bay so we chose Stumpy Bay 1 which apparently has good beach fishing. People spend day and night catching good hauls of salmon. The area is absolutely beautiful. There is one or two bars of mobile reception if you walk up on a hill and hold your phone in the right way. We were going to leave on Sunday morning but as this weekend is a long weekend we decided to leave this morning as more and more people were starting to arrive. The Tasmanian caravanners seem to arrive with portable stoves and tons of firewood. They are also well organised with portable windbreaks (and loads more alcohol).
Top Camp Mt William National Park

Top Camp Mt William National Park


Wind farm near Musselroe Bay

Wind farm near Musselroe Bay


Stumpy Bay Camp 1 at Mt William National Park

Stumpy Bay Camp 1 at Mt William National Park


Stumpy Bay Camp 1 at Mt William National Park

Stumpy Bay Camp 1 at Mt William National Park


Stumpy Bay Camp 1 at Mt William National Park

Stumpy Bay Camp 1 at Mt William National Park


Stumpy Bay Camp 1 at Mt William National Park

Stumpy Bay Camp 1 at Mt William National Park


Stumpy Bay Camp 1 at Mt William National Park

Stumpy Bay Camp 1 at Mt William National Park


Stumpy Bay Camp 1 at Mt William National Park

Stumpy Bay Camp 1 at Mt William National Park


Mother and Joey at Stumpy Bay

Mother and Joey at Stumpy Bay


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Our first stop this morning was at Little Blue Lake outside South Mount Cameron. Tin mining was the predominant industry since the 1880's. After the casserite was removed, clay (kolin) was left behind and when the mined areas filled with water, the water reflected on the clay showed as a brilliant turquoise colour.
Little Blue Lake near  South Mt Cameron

Little Blue Lake near South Mt Cameron


Little Blue Lake near  South Mt Cameron - clay deposits left after tin mining reflect sunlight and make the water appear turquoise blue

Little Blue Lake near South Mt Cameron - clay deposits left after tin mining reflect sunlight and make the water appear turquoise blue

Moorina is located on the Tasman Highway and was a major tin mining settlement with Chinese outnumbering the Caucasians. We stopped to see the monument to the Chinese - The Tin Dragon Trail which is located near the cemetery. We wandered amongst the old graves and it would seem that if you could survive childhood, childbirth and accidental death it would seem that there was a fairly good chance of reaching old age.
The Trail of the Tin Dragon Chinese memorial at Moorina

The Trail of the Tin Dragon Chinese memorial at Moorina


Chinese monument in Moorina Cemetery

Chinese monument in Moorina Cemetery

Just off the Highway was the Little Plains Lookout with an interesting story about the original inhabitant and his tiny hut. It is now owned by the Parks Service.
Little Plains Lookout

Little Plains Lookout


Little Plains Lookout

Little Plains Lookout

Further east we turned off at Pyengana to see the St Columba Falls. These are the tallest in Tasmania at 90 metres. In winter the flow over the falls in 220,000 litres per minute and an average of 42,000 litres per minute for the remainder of the year. The 400 metre walk is through spectacular rainforest. At the entrance hut, we read about Annie Beechley who was Australian Woman of the year in 1908 for surviving in the wilderness country where it was said "No man can survive."
Beginning of track to St Columba Falls, Pyengana

Beginning of track to St Columba Falls, Pyengana


Signage at St Columba Falls, Pyengana - the story of Annie Beechley 1908 Australian Woman of the Year

Signage at St Columba Falls, Pyengana - the story of Annie Beechley 1908 Australian Woman of the Year


St Columba Falls, Pyengana, 90 metres and one of the tallest in Tasmania

St Columba Falls, Pyengana, 90 metres and one of the tallest in Tasmania


St Columba Falls, Pyengana, 90 metres and one of the tallest in Tasmania

St Columba Falls, Pyengana, 90 metres and one of the tallest in Tasmania


Track to St Columba Falls, Pyengana

Track to St Columba Falls, Pyengana


Track to St Columba Falls, Pyengana

Track to St Columba Falls, Pyengana

On our way back from St Columba Falls, we called into the Pub in the Paddock. This aptly named business was established around 1880 and is located as its name describes. It's other attraction is Priscilla, the beer swilling pig. And what a size she is!!!!!
Pub in the Paddock, Pyengana

Pub in the Paddock, Pyengana


The Pub in the Paddock, Pyengana

The Pub in the Paddock, Pyengana


Pig at Pub in the Paddock, Pyengana

Pig at Pub in the Paddock, Pyengana


Pig at The Pub in the Paddock, Pyengana

Pig at The Pub in the Paddock, Pyengana

We stayed for lunch and were not sorry we spent an hour or so relaxing in the surrounds. Next stop, was the Pyengana Dairy Company which is a well known cheese factory run by fourth generation cheese maker John Healey and his family. The factory specialises in cloth bound cheddar. Our favourite is the Develish, a chilli and chive cheese. We bought up big and decided that for dinner we only needed wine and cheese.
Cheese Factory at Pyengana

Cheese Factory at Pyengana

Tonight we are camping at Moulting Bay camping area about 8 kms north east of St Helens. St Helens is the largest town on the north-east coast of Tasmania, Australia, on Georges Bay. It is known as the game fishing capital of Tasmania and is also renowned for its oysters (as are some other areas of Tasmania). It is located on the Tasman Highway, about 160 km east of Tasmania's second largest city, Launceston. In the early 2000s, the town was one of the fastest growing areas of Tasmania, and reached a population of 2049 at the 2006 census. St Helens is part of the Break O'Day Council, a council that includes the nearby town of Binalong Bay.

Posted by Kangatraveller 02:47 Comments (0)

Week 4 - LAUNCESTON

Catching up with my brother, Paul, in Launceston

semi-overcast 6 °C

The Spirit of Tasmania 1 entered the River Mersey at 6.15 am on Sunday 20 October. We had a fairly uneventful crossing. Last time we had cruise seats and Colleen tried to sleep behind a very loud snorer. This time we booked a cabin. This was so much better. Here are some pictures of the Spirit of Tasmania pulling into the River Mersey at Devonport.

6.15am arrival in Devonport, Tasmania (5)

6.15am arrival in Devonport, Tasmania (5)

We set off for Deloraine as a breakfast stop.

View near Deloraine (3)

View near Deloraine (3)


Panorama View near Deloraine

Panorama View near Deloraine

There was not a lot open on a Sunday morning so we turned around and went back to the Raspberry Farm where we had an excellent breakfast.

The place was busy as a European car Club contingent had also stopped there after coming over on the Spirit of Tasmania.
Breakfast stop at The Raspberry Farm

Breakfast stop at The Raspberry Farm


Car club at breakfast stop at The Raspberry Farm

Car club at breakfast stop at The Raspberry Farm

Car club at breakfast stop at The Raspberry Farm (3)

Car club at breakfast stop at The Raspberry Farm (3)

Car club at breakfast stop at The Raspberry Farm (5)

Car club at breakfast stop at The Raspberry Farm (5)

Car club at breakfast stop at The Raspberry Farm (7)

Car club at breakfast stop at The Raspberry Farm (7)

Paul was at home to greet us after we dropped our caravan off at the Treasure Island Caravan Park at Glen Dhu. We were staying with my brother Paul but as he lived on one of the steepest streets in South Launceston it was not a suitable parking place for our caravan.

Paul at home in Launceston

Paul at home in Launceston

Colleen at home in Paul's kitchen in Launceston (8)

Colleen at home in Paul's kitchen in Launceston (8)

Colleen at home in Paul's kitchen in Launceston (6)

Colleen at home in Paul's kitchen in Launceston (6)

View of Launceston from Paul's house (2)

View of Launceston from Paul's house (2)

Launceston is a city in the north of Tasmania, Australia at the junction of the North Esk and South Esk rivers where they become the Tamar River. Launceston is the second largest city in Tasmania after Hobart. With a population (greater urban and statistical sub division) of 106,153, Launceston is the ninth largest non-capital city in Australia.

Settled by Europeans in March 1806, Launceston is one of Australia's oldest cities and is home to many historic buildings. Like many Australian places, it was named after a town in the United Kingdom – in this case, Launceston, Cornwall.

Launceston has also been home to several firsts such as the first use of anaesthetic in the Southern Hemisphere, the first Australian city to have underground sewers and the first Australian city to be lit by hydroelectricity. The city has a temperate climate with four distinct seasons.

We have had a fair bit of rest and relaxation in Launceston. Yesterday we wandered around the CBD. Here are a few photos.

Launceston street view

Launceston street view

Launceston Mall

Launceston Mall

As Saturday is another rest day, we had a leisurely start and went with Paul to do some house hunting as he is looking to downsize. We went up past Cataract gorge to the old hydroelectric station on the South Esk River which started operation in 1895. Duck Reach Power Station was the first publicly owned hydro-electric plant in the Southern Hemisphere, and provided the Tasmanian city of Launceston with hydro-electric power from its construction in 1895 to its closure in 1955.

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This picture shows Paul and I on the lookout with the hydro station at the bottom of the Cataract Gorge. In the background are workers houses built a century ago.
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There were some magnificent photo opportunities driving back down to Launceston.

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We had planned to leave in the morning but have decided to stay one more day. On Monday morning we will travel north east to Scottsdale and then north to Bridport. Our first camp will be at Waterhouse Point Camping Area about 40km north east of Bridport in the Waterhouse Conservation Area. We plan to stop for three days before heading for Cape Naturaliste south of Musselroe Point on the north east coast of Tasmania.

Posted by Kangatraveller 22:07 Comments (0)

Week 3-LAKES ENTRANCE to MELBOURNE

Gippsland to Wilson's Promontory and Phillip Island to Melbourne

SUNDAY
Time to move on to the other side of the Gippsland Lakes to Paynesville. We had mapped out the next week that would have taken us to Melbourne via the Yarra Valley. however, with a bit more reading we decided to travel through Sale to Wilson's Promontory and then to Phillip Island. We plan to be in Melbourne on Thursday to have two days at Ashley Gardens Big 4 Caravan Park. We depart on the Spirit of Tasmania on Saturday night.

Our first stop was Paynesville which is across on the western side of the lakes.

Black swan at Paynesville

Black swan at Paynesville


Paynesville (2)

Paynesville (2)


Paynesville

Paynesville

We arrived with the rain so decided to do our washing at a laundromat, then have fish and chips and a coffee at a very fine bakery with a well patronised fish shop beside it. After lunch, we thought we would move on as the rain had really set in. We headed for Sale and set up camp at the Sale Showgrounds.

MONDAY

This morning we travelled on the South Gippsland Highway through many quaint dairy farming and grazing towns to Wilsons Promontory. The Wilsons Promontory National Park is the second most visited in Victoria. People have to enter a ballot in peak seasons for camping spots and cabins. The park caters very well for school groups, hikers and campers. Tidal River is the main Visitor Centre and also provides access to Norman Beach. Here are some photos of the area.

Road view into Wilsons Promontory National Park (6)

Road view into Wilsons Promontory National Park (6)


Tidal River, Wilsons Promontory (2)

Tidal River, Wilsons Promontory (2)


Tidal River, Wilsons Promontory

Tidal River, Wilsons Promontory


Norman Beach, Tidal River, Wilsons Promontory

Norman Beach, Tidal River, Wilsons Promontory


Norman Beach, Tidal River, Wilsons Promontory (2)

Norman Beach, Tidal River, Wilsons Promontory (2)


Australian Commandos Memorial at Tidal River, Wilsons Promontory

Australian Commandos Memorial at Tidal River, Wilsons Promontory

We stopped at Squeaky Beach for lunch. One of the Prom's iconic locations, the rounded grains of quartz make a 'squeak' when walked on.

Squeaky Beach, Wilsons Promontory (8)

Squeaky Beach, Wilsons Promontory (8)


Squeaky Beach, Tidal River, Wilsons Promontor (7)

Squeaky Beach, Tidal River, Wilsons Promontor (7)


Squeaky Beach, Tidal River, Wilsons Promontory

Squeaky Beach, Tidal River, Wilsons Promontory


Squeaky Beach (3)

Squeaky Beach (3)

The 30km drive in to Tidal River has quite a lot of wildlife close to the road. We saw a koala, kangaroos, emus and an abundance of birds.

Large Emu near Darby River, Wilsons Promontory

Large Emu near Darby River, Wilsons Promontory

There were some amazing views from Glennie Lookout and from the beaches towards Mt Oberon.
View from Glennie Lookout, Wilsons Promontory (5)

View from Glennie Lookout, Wilsons Promontory (5)


Panorama view from Glennie Lookout, Wilsons Promontory

Panorama view from Glennie Lookout, Wilsons Promontory

Mt Oberon,  Tidal River, Wilsons Promontory (2)

Mt Oberon, Tidal River, Wilsons Promontory (2)


Mt Oberon, Wilsons Promontory (2)

Mt Oberon, Wilsons Promontory (2)

TUESDAY
We arrived at the Big 4 Phillip Island Caravan Park early and booked in and set up. The main town on the island is Cowes, a very lovely little community. We had lunch and a wander down the main street. At dusk we set off for the Penguin Parade. We are not that into animals especially zoos, but we both enjoyed seeing the Little Penguins come ashore. The best part was seeing them walk alongside the boardwalk on their way to their burrows. Phillip Island’s Penguin Parade is the only commercial venue in the world where you can see penguins in their own environment.

Penguin Parade Centre

Penguin Parade Centre


Penguins coming ashore at Phillip Island

Penguins coming ashore at Phillip Island

WEDNESDAY

As we bought a three park pass for Phillip Island we visited the Koala Conservation Park this morning. We walked around the elevated boardwalks and were amazed to see nearly all the Koala population in the trees. They were well camouflaged and were a little difficult to see at first.

The Koala Conservation Centre is dedicated to koala research and conservation and allows the opportunity to view koalas in their natural habitat on treetop boardwalks.

Churchill Island Heritage Farm

Churchill Island Heritage Farm


Australian Koala Conservation Centre (2)

Australian Koala Conservation Centre (2)


Hello Boing (as our granddaughter Mia says)

Hello Boing (as our granddaughter Mia says)


Koala at the Australian Koala Conservation Centre (6)

Koala at the Australian Koala Conservation Centre (6)


Koala at the Australian Koala Conservation Centre (12)

Koala at the Australian Koala Conservation Centre (12)


Koala at the Australian Koala Conservation Centre (17)

Koala at the Australian Koala Conservation Centre (17)


Bird at Koala Conservation Park (3)

Bird at Koala Conservation Park (3)


Wetlands at the Australian Koala Conservation Centre

Wetlands at the Australian Koala Conservation Centre

Later in the day we visited the Churchill Heritage Farm. Here are some pictures from this historic centre.
Churchill Island Heritage Farm (6)

Churchill Island Heritage Farm (6)


Sheep at Churchill Island Heritage Farm

Sheep at Churchill Island Heritage Farm


Samuel Amess House at Churchill Island Heritage Farm (2)

Samuel Amess House at Churchill Island Heritage Farm (2)


Samuel Amess House at Churchill Island Heritage Farm (5)

Samuel Amess House at Churchill Island Heritage Farm (5)


Rogers Cottage at Churchill Island Heritage Farm

Rogers Cottage at Churchill Island Heritage Farm


Peacock at Samuel Amess House at Churchill Island Heritage Farm

Peacock at Samuel Amess House at Churchill Island Heritage Farm


Churchill Island Heritage Farm (3)

Churchill Island Heritage Farm (3)

Of course we had to have a look at the site for the Australian National Motorcycle Grand Prix which starts tomorrow.
Australian Motorcycle Grand Prix, Phillip Island (5)

Australian Motorcycle Grand Prix, Phillip Island (5)


Australian Motorcycle Grand Prix, Phillip Island

Australian Motorcycle Grand Prix, Phillip Island

THURSDAY

This morning we strike camp and set off on the short drive to Melbourne where we will stay for the next two nights at Ashley Gardens Big 4 caravan Park in the inner suburb of Braybrook.
Entrance to Ashley Gardens (2)

Entrance to Ashley Gardens (2)

FRIDAY

After doing the usual chores of washing, filling water tanks and breakfast, we took the 220 bus into town to do some shopping and have lunch.
Here are a few photos we took along the way.

Melbourne Star Ferris Wheel at Docklands

Melbourne Star Ferris Wheel at Docklands

Port Melbourne

Port Melbourne

Street scene Footscray, Melbourne

Street scene Footscray, Melbourne

Royal Arcade, Bourke Street Mall, Melbourne (3)

Royal Arcade, Bourke Street Mall, Melbourne (3)

Burke and Wills - the unlucky explorers (2)

Burke and Wills - the unlucky explorers (2)

St Paul's Cathedral, Melbourne

St Paul's Cathedral, Melbourne

Another of Melbourne CBD'd iconic laneways with cafes and restaurants (2)

Another of Melbourne CBD'd iconic laneways with cafes and restaurants (2)

SATURDAY

This morning we pack up and leave our car and caravan at Braybrook while we go into town for brunch. Later in the afternoon we plan to catch up with my nephew Chris and his fiancée Catharine down at Bay Street, Port Melbourne. They are a lovely young couple who bought their first house together at auction earlier in the day. By 5.00pm we drive onto Station Pier to board the Spirit of Tasmania for our night crossing to Devonport. We finally made it to our cabin at 7.00pm.
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The more we travel, the more we realize what a small world it really is. we caught up with our Brisbane Holiday village neighbours at Ashley Gardens. they are on their way to Perth for Christmas? When we set up in the Phillip Island caravan Park, the next door neighbour said, "You are a long way from Rockhampton." It turned out Bob and his wife knew me from years ago when we went to North Rocky High together in year 9 and 10. Bob's wife's sister went out with my younger brother, Graeme.

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