A Travellerspoint blog

WEEK 12- Triabunna to Maria Island and back to Launceston

Maria Island and a Tassie Christmas in Launceston

We arrived in Triabunna for a two night stay in a caravan park. We had booked a tour of Maria Island which is accessible by passenger ferry.
Triabunna from Freestone Point Road

Triabunna from Freestone Point Road

Maria Island is a mountainous island off the east coast of Tasmania. The entire island is a national park. Maria Island The island is about 20 km in length from north to south and, at its widest, is about 13 km west to east. The island was named in 1642 by Dutch explorer Abel Tasman after Maria van Diemen, wife of Anthony van Diemen, the Governor-General of the Dutch East Indies in Batavia.

We took the ferry and tour of the island. Our ferry dropped off other passengers at Darlington, the settlement on the island, and then took us around the northern and eastern shores of Maria Island to see the Fossil Cliffs and then on to Riedele Bay to drop anchor for lunch on board our boat.
East Coast Ferry with 3 x 300HP Suzuki outboards

East Coast Ferry with 3 x 300HP Suzuki outboards


Fossil Cliffs, Maria Island

Fossil Cliffs, Maria Island


Fossil Cliffs, Maria Island

Fossil Cliffs, Maria Island


Fossil Cliffs, Maria Island

Fossil Cliffs, Maria Island


Granite cliff near Mistaken Cape

Granite cliff near Mistaken Cape

We stopped to have a close look at some sea caves along the eastern shore.
Inside sea cave in Fossil Cliffs, Maria Island

Inside sea cave in Fossil Cliffs, Maria Island


Ign‌eous rock in Sea caves in Fossil Cliffs, Maria Island

Ign‌eous rock in Sea caves in Fossil Cliffs, Maria Island


Inside sea cave in Fossil Cliffs, Maria Island

Inside sea cave in Fossil Cliffs, Maria Island


Inside sea cave in Fossil Cliffs, Maria Island

Inside sea cave in Fossil Cliffs, Maria Island


Inside sea cave in Fossil Cliffs, Maria Island

Inside sea cave in Fossil Cliffs, Maria Island


Ign‌eous rock in Sea caves in Fossil Cliffs, Maria Island (2)

Ign‌eous rock in Sea caves in Fossil Cliffs, Maria Island (2)

Here are some pictures of our lunch stop on the eastern side of the island. After lunch we headed back to Darlington to have a walk around the old convict settlement.
Riedele Bay - our anchorage for lunch

Riedele Bay - our anchorage for lunch


Riedle Bay - our boat roared through this break at high speed

Riedle Bay - our boat roared through this break at high speed


McRaes Isthmus

McRaes Isthmus


McRaes Isthmus

McRaes Isthmus


Mistaken Cape, Maria Island

Mistaken Cape, Maria Island


Limestone stalactites on Fossil Cliffs, Maria Island

Limestone stalactites on Fossil Cliffs, Maria Island


Waterfall at Fossil Cliffs, Maria Island

Waterfall at Fossil Cliffs, Maria Island


Waterfall on Fossil Cliffs, Maria Island

Waterfall on Fossil Cliffs, Maria Island


Terrace houses built 1880s on Maria Island

Terrace houses built 1880s on Maria Island


Whale bones on Maria Island

Whale bones on Maria Island


Inside the Coffee house built 1888

Inside the Coffee house built 1888

For two periods during the first half of the 19th century, Maria Island hosted convict settlements. The island's first convict era was between 1825 and 1832 and its second - the probation station era - between 1842 and 1851. Among those held during the second era was the Irish nationalist leader William Smith O'Brien, exiled for his part in the Young Irelander Rebellion of 1848. His cottage still exists in the nearby former penal colony Port Arthur to where he was deported after his time on Maria Island. He was later transferred to New Norfolk on the Derwent River.

Three structures from the first convict era remain in the Darlington area: the Commissariat Store built in 1825 and presently used as the park's reception and visitor centre; the convict penitentiary, completed in 1828 and now used to accommodate visitors rather than detain them; and the convict-built dam on Bernacchis Creek, which still provides Darlington's water.
The Comissariat built 1825

The Comissariat built 1825


Harbour at Darlington, Maria Island

Harbour at Darlington, Maria Island


‎William Smith O'Brien,  disssident Irish parliamentarian transported to Tasmania in exile

‎William Smith O'Brien, disssident Irish parliamentarian transported to Tasmania in exile


Panorama showing National Portland Cement silos from 1920 and Comissariat from 1825

Panorama showing National Portland Cement silos from 1920 and Comissariat from 1825

On our return to Triabunna we stopped at the Painted Cliffs on the western shore of Maria Island.
The Painted Cliffs on Maria Island

The Painted Cliffs on Maria Island


Panorama of Painted Cliffs, Maria Island

Panorama of Painted Cliffs, Maria Island


Painted Cliffs, Maria Island

Painted Cliffs, Maria Island

On Sunday we drove to Orford just a few kilometres south of Triabunna and stopped at some of the stunning beaches along the way. The most beautiful so far was Rheban Beach about 12km south of Orford with about half the distance on narrow gravel road.Panorama near Orford looking towards Freycinet Peninsula

Panorama near Orford looking towards Freycinet Peninsula


Orford

Orford


House with a view towards Maria Island

House with a view towards Maria Island


Panorama of Rheban Beach south of Orford

Panorama of Rheban Beach south of Orford


Rheban Beach south of Orford

Rheban Beach south of Orford


View near Orford showing Maria Island in background

View near Orford showing Maria Island in background

We moved back to Campania but not before stopping off at Buckland, a tiny community, just outside the Buckland Military Training Area. The pub at Buckland allows camping behind the pub if you give a gold coin donation at the bar to the RFDS.

We spent a few hours at Richmond before arriving at our camp spot at Campania for the next two nights. We had a nice day wine tasting at Frogmore Winery, cherry buying at a roadside stall, visiting Wicked Cheese and then having a roast lamb dinner with two other couples staying at Campania. We were all from Queensland (actually, at this time of year, I think every fourth person must be a Queenslander.)
Mt Pleasant Astronomy Observatory view from Frogmore Vineyard

Mt Pleasant Astronomy Observatory view from Frogmore Vineyard

Our next destination was Hobart to leave the Quantum at the Treasure Island Caravan Park ($5 per night for storage) for the next 9 days while we travel back to @aunceston to have Christmas with my brother Paul. We plan to be back in Hobart for 8 days for the Taste Festival and the coming in of the yachts from the Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race.

On our way back to Launceston we called into the historic village of Ross for lunch.
Historic 1836 bridge at Ross is still in use

Historic 1836 bridge at Ross is still in use


Historic 1836 bridge at Ross is still in use

Historic 1836 bridge at Ross is still in use


Historic Ross - old church

Historic Ross - old church


Female Convict Factory, Ross

Female Convict Factory, Ross


Main Street, Ross

Main Street, Ross


Tasmanian Wool Centre at Ross

Tasmanian Wool Centre at Ross


Old buildings at Somercote's Farm near Ross

Old buildings at Somercote's Farm near Ross


Somercotes Cherry Farm south of Ross

Somercotes Cherry Farm south of Ross

Posted by Kangatraveller 21:22 Comments (1)

WEEK 11- Campania to Port Arthur and Hobart

Port Arthur to Hobart and a trek up north to Triabunna

Friday night we stayed at a free camp at Campania, a beautiful little town about 7km north of Richmond, a beautiful Georgian Period town with many of the buildings in original condition. The bridge at Richmond was constructed by convict labour in 1823 and is in use still today.
Main Street, Richmond

Main Street, Richmond


Main Street, Richmond

Main Street, Richmond


Richmond Bridge 1823

Richmond Bridge 1823

We filled up with diesel at Sorell. Colleen took a picture of our usual tank filling.
Diesel fill up at Sorell

Diesel fill up at Sorell

The Tasman Peninsula has much more than Port Arthur. The peninsula on which Port Arthur is located is a naturally secure site by being surrounded by water (rumoured by the administration to be shark-infested). The 30m wide isthmus of Eaglehawk Neck that was the only connection to the mainland was fenced and guarded by soldiers, man traps and half-starved dogs.

View from road new Dodges Ferry

View from road new Dodges Ferry


The Blow Hole, Fossil Bay

The Blow Hole, Fossil Bay


Tasman Arch

Tasman Arch


Fossil Bay near Doo Town, Tasman Peninsula

Fossil Bay near Doo Town, Tasman Peninsula

Sunday was an overcast day so we waited till the showers eased off before we went to Port Arthur. Entry tickets are good for the second day so we went back to Port Arthur to have a closer look at the buildings.

Port Arthur is a small town and former convict settlement on the Tasman Peninsula, in Tasmania, Australia. Port Arthur is one of Australia's most significant heritage areas and an open air museum.
The site forms part of the Australian Convict Sites, a World Heritage property consisting of eleven remnant penal sites originally built within the British Empire during the 18th and 19th centuries on fertile Australian coastal strips. Collectively, these sites, including Port Arthur, now represent, "...the best surviving examples of large-scale convict transportation and the colonial expansion of European powers through the presence and labour of convicts."

Port Arthur is officially Tasmania's top tourist attraction. It is located approximately 60 kilometres south east of the state capital, Hobart. In 1996 it was the scene of the worst mass murder event in post-colonial Australian history.

Memorial at Broad Arrow Cafe

Memorial at Broad Arrow Cafe


Shell of the Broad Arrow Cafe

Shell of the Broad Arrow Cafe


Ship building yards and dry docks at Port Arthur

Ship building yards and dry docks at Port Arthur


Port Arthur with Penitentiary in foreground

Port Arthur with Penitentiary in foreground


Port Arthur

Port Arthur


Penitentiary at Port Arthur

Penitentiary at Port Arthur


Port Arthur with Penitentiary in foreground

Port Arthur with Penitentiary in foreground

On the Sunday we took the cruise to the Isle of the Dead and Port Puer Boys Reformatory. Later in the afternoon we did the introductory tour. This seems a bit back the front but worked out okay as we had been to Port Arthur a few years ago. Port Arthur was also the destination for juvenile convicts, receiving many boys, some as young as nine. The boys were separated from the main convict population and kept on Point Puer, the British Empire's second boys' prison. Like the adults, the boys were used in hard labour such as stone cutting and construction. Point Puer, across the harbour from the main settlement, was the site of the first boys' reformatory in the British Empire. Boys sent there were given some basic education, and taught trade skills.
Port Puer Boys Reform Centre

Port Puer Boys Reform Centre

The guides around the Centre do a fantastic job of bringing the past to life.
Isle of the Dead

Isle of the Dead


Isle of the Dead

Isle of the Dead


Isle of the Dead

Isle of the Dead


Isle of the Dead

Isle of the Dead

Port Arthur was not only a prison for convicts but also political dissidents from Ireland, Canada and other parts of the British Empire. One of the most famous was Irish Parliamentarian William Smith O'Brien.
William Smith O'Brien's Cottage - political prisoner - dissident Irish Parliamentarian in exile

William Smith O'Brien's Cottage - political prisoner - dissident Irish Parliamentarian in exile


William Smith O'Brien's Cottage - political prisoner - dissident Irish Parliamentarian in exile

William Smith O'Brien's Cottage - political prisoner - dissident Irish Parliamentarian in exile

A rather horrifying experiment was the Separate Prison.Port Arthur was one example of the “Separate Prison Typology” (sometimes known as the Model prison), which emerged from Jeremy Bentham’s theories and his panopticon. The prison was completed in 1853 but then extended in 1855. The layout of the prison was fairly symmetrical. It was a cross shape with exercise yards at each corner. The prisoner wings were each connected to the surveillance core of the Prison as well as the Chapel, in the Centre Hall. From this surveillance hub each wing could be clearly seen, although individual cells could not.

The Separate Prison System also signalled a shift from physical punishment to psychological punishment. It was thought that the hard corporal punishment, such as whippings, used in other penal stations only served to harden criminals, and did nothing to turn them from their immoral ways. For example, food was used to reward well-behaved prisoners and as punishment for troublemakers. As a reward, a prisoner could receive larger amounts of food or even luxury items such as tea, sugar and tobacco. As punishment, the prisoners would receive the bare minimum of bread and water. Under this system of punishment the "Silent System" was implemented in the building. Here prisoners were hooded and made to stay silent, this was supposed to allow time for the prisoner to reflect upon the actions which had brought him there. Many of the prisoners in the Separate Prison developed mental illness from the lack of light and sound. This was an unintended outcome although the asylum was built right next to the Separate Prison. In many ways Port Arthur was the model for many of the penal reform movement, despite shipping, housing and slave-labour use of convicts being as harsh, or worse, than others stations around the nation.

The Separate Prison

The Separate Prison


Inside The Separate Prison

Inside The Separate Prison

As the convict population aged the government took on responsibility for them in an embryonic social welfare program with the Paupers Mess and other facilities.
David leaving the Mess at the Asylum at Port Arthur

David leaving the Mess at the Asylum at Port Arthur

Many of the buildings are in very good condition. We were impressed with the Commandant's House.
Commandant's House, Port Arthur

Commandant's House, Port Arthur


Commandant's Study

Commandant's Study


Kitchen  Commandant's House, Port Arthur

Kitchen Commandant's House, Port Arthur


Sitting Room Commandant's House, Port Arthur

Sitting Room Commandant's House, Port Arthur


Doctor's House, Civil Service Row, Port Arthur

Doctor's House, Civil Service Row, Port Arthur


Doctor's House, Civil Service Row, Port Arthur

Doctor's House, Civil Service Row, Port Arthur


Guard Tower, Port Arthur

Guard Tower, Port Arthur


Garrison for soldiers at Port Arthur

Garrison for soldiers at Port Arthur


Government Gardens

Government Gardens


Panorama of Port Arthur from the Guard Tower

Panorama of Port Arthur from the Guard Tower


land view of Port Arthur with Diamond Princess cruise ship in the harbour

land view of Port Arthur with Diamond Princess cruise ship in the harbour


St David's Church Port Arthur

St David's Church Port Arthur


St David's Church Port Arthur

St David's Church Port Arthur


St David's Church Port Arthur

St David's Church Port Arthur

The Harbour at Port Arthur can accommodate large cruise ships as it is very deep.
View of Port Arthur with Diamond Princess cruise ship in the harbour

View of Port Arthur with Diamond Princess cruise ship in the harbour


View of Port Arthur with Diamond Princess cruise ship in the harbour

View of Port Arthur with Diamond Princess cruise ship in the harbour

On Tuesday we visited the Waterfront in Hobart for lunch at Fish Frenzy. they self proclaim that they are "arguably the best fish and chips in Australia". It is hard to argue with this claim.
The Waterfront, Sullivans Cove

The Waterfront, Sullivans Cove


The Waterfront, Sullivans Cove - Greenpeace's Sea Shepherd at anchor

The Waterfront, Sullivans Cove - Greenpeace's Sea Shepherd at anchor

On Wednesday I went to the Cascade Brewery for their tour. Colleen declined to go though we did have lunch there after the tour. Cascade Brewery is the oldest continually operating brewery in Australia. The Cascade estate (originally a saw milling operation) was founded beside the clean water of the Hobart Rivulet in 1824 by Peter Degraves (1778 – 31 December 1852), an entrepreneur who emigrated from England on the Hope in 1824. In 1826 charges were laid against Degraves for debt and he was taken into custody until 1831. In 1832 Peter Degraves built a Brewery on his property.

Cascade Brewery

Cascade Brewery


Cascade Brewery Visitor centre gardens

Cascade Brewery Visitor centre gardens


Cascade Brewery

Cascade Brewery


Cascade Brewery Grain silos

Cascade Brewery Grain silos

Thursday was time to go so we drove back to Campania, 7km north of Richmond to spend two free camping. We found time to call into the Cadbury Factory at Claremont. Colleen did the "shopping" while I sat outside in the sunshine and was awed by the quantities of chocolates being carried away by tourists.
large_Cadbury_Fa..aremont__2_.jpg

On Saturday we drove north east to Triabunna to catch the ferry to Maria Island.

Posted by Kangatraveller 14:55 Comments (0)

WEEK 10 - HUONVILLE to BRUNY ISLAND

Tahune Forest Air Walk, Huon Jet and plenty of sunshine

After leaving Cockle Creek on Saturday morning we drove through Geeveston to travel the 29km to the Tahune Forest Airwalk. On the way, we stopped at the Lookin Lookout, a rather unusual display of old forestry equipment set up so that people could be on the lookout for items such as steel shovels etc between the two displays of an old steam engine and a train that ran its steel wheels along very straight logs.
Lookin Lookout on way to Tahune Air walk

Lookin Lookout on way to Tahune Air walk


Old logging winch at Lookin Lookout

Old logging winch at Lookin Lookout


Old logging train running on log rails at Lookin Lookout

Old logging train running on log rails at Lookin Lookout

Sunday morning delivered fine weather and sunshine at the Tahune Forest Airwalk. We woke early as we stayed the night at the centre and went on the Huon Trail walk. On the way we stopped at the ruins of McPartlans House. He was a policeman who hunted down escapee convicts and also kept order in the forestry and mining camps.
Our camp site at Tahune Forest Air Walk

Our camp site at Tahune Forest Air Walk


Huon Trail Walk we did at 7.30am

Huon Trail Walk we did at 7.30am


Ruins of McPartlan's House

Ruins of McPartlan's House


Ruins of McPartlan's House

Ruins of McPartlan's House

Further on the walk we came to the Suspension Bridges across the Huon River.
Suspension Bridges over the Huon River

Suspension Bridges over the Huon River

When the centre opened at 9.00am, we took the trail up to the Tahune Airwalk. Tahune Airwalk is a Forestry Tasmania-owned and operated tourist attraction in Tasmania. Located 70 km south of the capital Hobart in the Huon Valley on the Huon River banks, the airwalk offers an aerial view of the state's southern forests.The treetop walk overlooks the Huon River. The swinging bridges crosses the Huon River.

The walkway is a level steel structure that is suspended over the treetops, as high as 45 metres in places. It is 620 metres long, 1.6 kilometres including the access paths and 112 steps. and is a level structure with a steel walkway. The cantilever on the end holds 10 tonnes which is equivalent to 120 crowded people or ten baby elephants.
Tahune Forest Air Walk Centre

Tahune Forest Air Walk Centre


Beginning of Tahune Forest Air Walk

Beginning of Tahune Forest Air Walk


Walk up to the Tahune Air Walk (5)

Walk up to the Tahune Air Walk (5)


Crossing over the Huon River at Tahune Forest

Crossing over the Huon River at Tahune Forest


Huon River

Huon River


Huon River

Huon River


Tahune Air Walk

Tahune Air Walk


The Wishing Tree on The Tahune Forest Air Walk

The Wishing Tree on The Tahune Forest Air Walk


Cantilever near the confluence of the Huon and Picton Rivers on The Tahune Forest Air Walk

Cantilever near the confluence of the Huon and Picton Rivers on The Tahune Forest Air Walk


On the cantilever of the Tahune Air Walk

On the cantilever of the Tahune Air Walk


Did you know signage at the Tahune Forest Airwalk

Did you know signage at the Tahune Forest Airwalk

We left the Tahune Forest via Geeveston and drove the 50km to Huonville on the Huon River. We spent considerable time at the car wash getting the Cruiser and Quantum back to shiny newness,Wood sculptures at Geeveston

Wood sculptures at Geeveston


After pic of a clean Toyota and Quantum after car washing at Huonville

After pic of a clean Toyota and Quantum after car washing at Huonville

On Monday morning we went on the Huon Jet Boat. The boats are powered by Marinised 5.7 litre fuel injected V8 Chevrolet engines which drive a 8 inch Hamilton Jet water jet unit. This combination can propel the loaded vessel along at speeds of up to 80 kph in water only 100mm deep and allow the vessel to be turned in its own length.
Huon Jet Boat 5.6m powered by a 5.7 V8 Chev motor

Huon Jet Boat 5.6m powered by a 5.7 V8 Chev motor


Colleen at the Huon Jet Boat

Colleen at the Huon Jet Boat

Our ride 12km up the river saw the boat weaving in and out fallen logs and forest canopy overhanging the banks. There are stands of Huon pines along the banks. We turned around near a little township called Glen Huon. Up and down the river we had the thrill of 360 degree turns at high speed. Down near the bridge in Huonville we stopped to see an Eastern Osprey up in the tallest branches.
Huon River on Huon Jet Boat ride

Huon River on Huon Jet Boat ride


Huon River on Huon Jet Boat ride

Huon River on Huon Jet Boat ride


Huon River on Huon Jet Boat ride

Huon River on Huon Jet Boat ride


Huon River on Huon Jet Boat ride

Huon River on Huon Jet Boat ride


Glen Huon up the Huon River

Glen Huon up the Huon River


Glen Huon

Glen Huon


Fly fishermen on the Huon River on Huon Jet Boat ride

Fly fishermen on the Huon River on Huon Jet Boat ride


Mushroom Farm on the banks of the Huon River

Mushroom Farm on the banks of the Huon River


Eastern Osprey in tree on the Huon River

Eastern Osprey in tree on the Huon River

Tuesday morning we left Huonville for Bruny Island. We took the long way around through the coastline Cygnet and stopped at a beautiful beach called Verona Sands.
Verona Sands Beach

Verona Sands Beach


Eggs and Bacon Bay

Eggs and Bacon Bay


View from The Neck Campground, Bruny Island

View from The Neck Campground, Bruny Island

Our camp for the night was to be on the Gordon foreshore fronting the D'Entrecasteau Passage. At the last minute we decided to catch the ferry across at Kettering. The Murambeena is the only way to travel by vehicle to the island. When we arrived we stopped at the get Schucked Oyster Farm ($8 a dozen for live oysters or $13 a dozen for Schucked oysters - I now have a proper shucking knife to use instead of my trusty Leatherman) and the Bruny Island Cheese Company.
Penguin Rookery at The Neck Bruny Island

Penguin Rookery at The Neck Bruny Island

We stayed at the Neck Campground for three nights. This is a beautiful area and it was even better when it wasn't raining. A school or church camping group was learning to surf on the Neck Beach.
Campground at the Neck

Campground at the Neck


Bird pecking our mirror at The Neck

Bird pecking our mirror at The Neck


The Neck Beach looking south

The Neck Beach looking south


The neck beach

The neck beach


Surfing Tassie style at the Neck Beach

Surfing Tassie style at the Neck Beach

On our last day we drove down to Adventure Bay to see the Captain Cook Monument. Captain James Cook landed here in the Resolution on 26 January 1777. Captain Furneaux also landed here 4 years earlier in 1773 but did not claim the land in the name of the French King.
Captain Cook Memorial Adventure Bay South Bruny Island

Captain Cook Memorial Adventure Bay South Bruny Island


Captain Cook Memorial Adventure Bay South Bruny Island

Captain Cook Memorial Adventure Bay South Bruny Island


Adventure Bay South Bruny Island

Adventure Bay South Bruny Island

We visited the little townships of Alonnah and Lunnawanna and then drove the reasonable gravel roads down to Cape Bruny to the National Park and the Lighthouse. The lighthouse was built by convicts in 1827 and was decommissioned in 1996.
Barkers Beach, South Bruny

Barkers Beach, South Bruny


Mabel Bay, South Bruny

Mabel Bay, South Bruny


Cloudy Bay from Bruny Island Lighthouse

Cloudy Bay from Bruny Island Lighthouse


Cape Bruny Lighthouse

Cape Bruny Lighthouse


Cape Bruny Lighthouse

Cape Bruny Lighthouse


David at Bruny Island Lighthouse

David at Bruny Island Lighthouse


Bruny Island Lighthouse

Bruny Island Lighthouse

Before we left the island we had to go past the get Shucked Oyster Farm again so we replenished the oysters again.
Waiting for service at the Get Shucked Oyster Farm at Bruny Island

Waiting for service at the Get Shucked Oyster Farm at Bruny Island

We drove back to Hobart through beautiful little towns like Snug and then travelled to a place called Campania just north of Richmond for our next camp. This little place is in the Coal River Valley noted for its Wineries, vineyards, AND CHERRIES!!!!

Posted by Kangatraveller 16:51 Comments (0)

WEEK 9 - OATLANDS to COCKLE CREEK

Leaving the Midlands to go south of Hobart to The End of the Road

After a a very comfortable day in conversation and catching up with old friends, we drove back to Launceston for three days. We felt easy about leaving our Quantum in the camping area beside Lake Dulverton at Oatlands.
Lake Dulverton Camping Area at Oatlands

Lake Dulverton Camping Area at Oatlands


Lake Dulverton Camping Area at Oatlands

Lake Dulverton Camping Area at Oatlands

Main Street Oatlands

Main Street Oatlands


Main Street Oatlands

Main Street Oatlands


MGs parked near hotel in Oatlands

MGs parked near hotel in Oatlands


old shed at Oatlands

old shed at Oatlands

We returned Wednesday afternoon to have a look at the old Callington Mill at Oatlands.
Callington Mill at Oatlands

Callington Mill at Oatlands


Callington Mill at Oatlands

Callington Mill at Oatlands


Callington Mill at Oatlands

Callington Mill at Oatlands


Mill Lane, Callington Mill at Oatlands

Mill Lane, Callington Mill at Oatlands

Thursday morning was a wet and windy day so we packed up early and headed south. We took the A1 to Hobart and then the A6 down to Cockle Creek. We stopped for breakfast at the camping ground on the foreshore at Franklin.

Derwent River at Glenorchy

Derwent River at Glenorchy

Derwent River at Glenorchy

Derwent River at Glenorchy


Camp ground at Franklin foreshore

Camp ground at Franklin foreshore


Camp ground at Franklin foreshore

Camp ground at Franklin foreshore

We had planned to stay the night there but as the day was young and the weather was rain forecasted for the day, we decided to travel onto Cockle Creek the most southerly road in Australia. We took some pictures along the way at Dover, Southport and at the end of the road at Cockle Creek.
Dover

Dover


Southport looking towards Bruny Island

Southport looking towards Bruny Island


Southport, Tasmania

Southport, Tasmania

Here are some pictures of our camping ground at Cockle Creek.
Cockle Creek Camp Ground

Cockle Creek Camp Ground

The bridge over Cockle Creek is due to be closed to all traffic with the exceptions of locals and National Parks officers in December and this has raised the ire of many people/
The End of the Road, Cockle Creek, most southerly road in Australia

The End of the Road, Cockle Creek, most southerly road in Australia


Bridge at Cockle Creek

Bridge at Cockle Creek


Cockle Creek inland of bridge

Cockle Creek inland of bridge


Lagoon at Cockle Creek

Lagoon at Cockle Creek

We walked down to the Whale Sculpture on the beach. Near the National Parks station there is a sign saying End of the Road as this is the most southerly street in Tasmania.
NP signage at Cockle Creek

NP signage at Cockle Creek


View towards Cockle Creek

View towards Cockle Creek


Fly wheel from old timber mill middle of last century

Fly wheel from old timber mill middle of last century


Fishers Point Recherche Bay

Fishers Point Recherche Bay


Monument to the Southern Right Whale

Monument to the Southern Right Whale


Monument to the Southern Right Whale

Monument to the Southern Right Whale


Whale Monument

Whale Monument

ON Saturday we broke camp early and headed for Lune River to catch the Ida Bay Tourist Train. On the way we passed through the tiny community of Catamaran.
Catamaran

Catamaran

The Ida bay Railway is the last operating bush tramway in Tasmania and also has the distinction of being the most southerly railway in Australia. The 2'0" gauge line was constructed in 1922 to carry limestone from quarries south east of the Lune River to a Wharf at Brick Point on Ida Bay.

After World War II changes were made to the operation. New workshops, engine shed and workman's quarters were constructed beside Cockle Creek road. These facilities now form the operational headquarters of the line. Five Malcolm Moore petrol locos were acquired from the Army surplus so that the last of the steam locos could be retired.

1950 saw a new quarry closer to the Lune River so transport was changed by filling steel or wooden boxes with limestone and placing them onto four wheel wagons for transport to the wharf. Loaded trains of 12 wagons were kept in check by over-ride brakes connected to the wagon couplings. The carriage of limestone went to trucks in 1975.

In 1977 the Tasmanian Govt purchased the railway and rolling stock. It began as a tourist attraction on 20 December 1977.

The railway was considered unsafe in 2002 and closed. New owners took over in January 2005 and implemented an intensive maintenance program.

The two hour return trip takes in the sights of Ida Bay through to Deep Hole. At Deep Hole, you can look across to Bruny Island and the southern most town of Southport.
Ida Bay Railway Station at Lune River

Ida Bay Railway Station at Lune River


Ida Bay Railway Station at Lune River

Ida Bay Railway Station at Lune River


Ida Bay

Ida Bay


Ida Bay

Ida Bay


Panorama at Ida Bay

Panorama at Ida Bay


Cemetery at Ida Bay Junction

Cemetery at Ida Bay Junction


Ida Bay train terminus

Ida Bay train terminus


Ida Bay with Bruny Island in background

Ida Bay with Bruny Island in background


Train at Ida Bay terminus

Train at Ida Bay terminus

We stayed at the Tahune Air Walk on Saturday night as we wanted to do some of the forest walks and then the Tahune Air Walk when it opened at 9.00am. This camp was one of our best so far with access to facilities and the break of a new sunny day.

Posted by Kangatraveller 21:26 Comments (0)

WEEK 8- ARTHUR RIVER, STRAHAN, BOTHWELL, MIDLANDS TAS

Enjoying fine weather on the west coast before heading east

semi-overcast 15 °C

Sunday morning was another beautiful day in Arthur River. We were on the road early and enjoyed the beautiful drive back to Smithton.
Dairying country west of Smithton

Dairying country west of Smithton


Dairying country west of Smithton

Dairying country west of Smithton

We drove east to Burnie and then took the main road down past Cradle Mountain to Strahan. This part of Tasmania relies on logging as the main economic driver. Here are some pictures of the areas.
Taswoods Eucalyptus forests south of Burnie

Taswoods Eucalyptus forests south of Burnie


Taswoods Eucalyptus forests south of Burnie

Taswoods Eucalyptus forests south of Burnie

Zeehan was our lunch stop on Sunday. We had plenty of time to visit the superb West Coast Heritage Centre incorporating the West Coast Pioneers' Museum in the Main Street of Zeehan.
Zeehan School of Mines

Zeehan School of Mines


Zeehan School of Mines and Mettalurgy - 1894-1930

Zeehan School of Mines and Mettalurgy - 1894-1930


Zeehan Gaiety Theatre and Police Station with Court House behind

Zeehan Gaiety Theatre and Police Station with Court House behind


Gaiety Theatre near Zeehan Pioneers Museum

Gaiety Theatre near Zeehan Pioneers Museum


No 8 Krauss Locomotive at Zeehan Pioneers Museum

No 8 Krauss Locomotive at Zeehan Pioneers Museum


Mining machinery at rear of Zeehan Pioneers Museum

Mining machinery at rear of Zeehan Pioneers Museum


Blacksmith's Shop at rear of Zeehan Pioneers Museum

Blacksmith's Shop at rear of Zeehan Pioneers Museum


Beyer-Peacock Locomotive C1 at Zeehan Pioneers Museum

Beyer-Peacock Locomotive C1 at Zeehan Pioneers Museum

King O'Malley, an American, called Zeehan home when he was the Member for West Tasmania. King O'Malley was instrumental in forming "the people's bank", the Commonwealth and in establishing Canberra as the site of the new capital of Australia.
King O'Malley, The West Coast Pioneers Museum

King O'Malley, The West Coast Pioneers Museum

Strahan is 41 km south of Zeehan on the West Coast. Strahan is built on the foreshore of Macquarie Harbour. Macquarie Harbour is a large, shallow, but navigable by shallow draft vessels inlet on the West Coast of Tasmania, Australia. The harbour is named after Scottish Major General Lachlan Macquarie, 5th Governor of New South Wales. The harbour is six times the size of Sydney Harbour And half as big a Port Phillip Bay. Seven large fish farms grow salmon and trout.
View from Railway Station back across to Esplanade, Strahan

View from Railway Station back across to Esplanade, Strahan


Esplanade at Strahan

Esplanade at Strahan


Panorama of Petuna Fish Farm, Macquarie Harbour (4)

Panorama of Petuna Fish Farm, Macquarie Harbour (4)


Petuna Fish Farm, Macquarie Harbour

Petuna Fish Farm, Macquarie Harbour

As Monday was a clear sunny day, we boarded the Lady Jane Franklin 11 for the cruise. Our journey was to take us out to Hell's Gates (the very narrow entrance to Macquarie Harbour) and out into the open sea. The cruise continued on up the Gordon River which empties into Macquarie Harbour. Upstream of the Gordon, it is joined by the Franklin River. We stopped upriver at Heritage Landing.
Esplanade at Strahan

Esplanade at Strahan


David on the Lady Jane Franklin 11

David on the Lady Jane Franklin 11


Sign Franklin - Gordon Wild Rivers NP

Sign Franklin - Gordon Wild Rivers NP


Mouth of Gordon River, Macquarie Harbour

Mouth of Gordon River, Macquarie Harbour


Gordon River

Gordon River


Gordon River

Gordon River


Gordon River

Gordon River


Frenchman's Cap

Frenchman's Cap


Heritage Walk, Gordon River

Heritage Walk, Gordon River


Heritage Walk, Gordon River

Heritage Walk, Gordon River


Heritage Walk, Gordon River

Heritage Walk, Gordon River


Heritage Walk, Gordon River )

Heritage Walk, Gordon River )

After a nice buffet lunch on board the boat as it returned down the Gordon, we stopped off at Sarah Island. The Macquarie Harbour Penal Station was established on Sarah Island, Macquarie Harbour in the former colony of Van Diemen's Land, now Tasmania, Australia, operated between 1822 and 1833. The settlement housed mainly male convicts, with a small number of women. During its 11 years of operation, the penal colony achieved a reputation as one of the harshest penal settlements in the Australian colonies.
Disembarking from  Lady Jane Franklin 11

Disembarking from Lady Jane Franklin 11


Porpoise trailing the Lady Jane Franklin 11 in Macquarie Harbour

Porpoise trailing the Lady Jane Franklin 11 in Macquarie Harbour

The penal station was established as a place of banishment within the Australian colonies. It took the worst convicts and those who had escaped from other settlements. The isolated land was ideally suited for its purpose. It was separated from the mainland by treacherous seas, surrounded by a mountainous wilderness and was hundreds of miles away from the colony's other settled areas. The only seaward access was through a treacherous narrow channel known as Hell's Gates.
Lighthouse at Hell's Gate

Lighthouse at Hell's Gate


Lighthouse at Hell's Gate

Lighthouse at Hell's Gate

Despite its isolated location, a considerable number of convicts attempted to escape from the island. Bushranger Matthew Brady was among a party that successfully escaped to Hobart in 1824 after tying up their overseer and seizing a boat. James Goodwin was pardoned after his 1828 escape and was subsequently employed to make official surveys of the wilderness he had passed through. Sarah Island's most infamous escapee was Alexander Pearce who managed to get away twice. On both occasions, he cannibalized his fellow escapees.
Guide on Sarah Island

Guide on Sarah Island


Sarah Island

Sarah Island

A shipbuilding industry which produced 131 ships was established on the island. Convicts were employed in the shipbuilding industry. For a short period, it was the largest shipbuilding operation in the Australian colonies. Chained convicts had the task of cutting down Huon Pine trees and rafting the logs down the river. Eventually the heavily forested island was cleared by the convicts. A tall wall was then built along the windward side of the island to provide shelter for the shipyards from the roaring forties blowing up the harbour.
Sarah Island

Sarah Island


Sarah Island

Sarah Island


Sarah Island

Sarah Island


Sarah Island

Sarah Island


The Penitentiary, Sarah Island

The Penitentiary, Sarah Island

In the afternoon, we went for a drive down an 11km gravel road to see Macquarie Heads from the shore. Just around the Heads is Ocean Beach. Ocean Beach, at Strahan on the wild west coast of Tasmania, is the highest energy beach in Australia and has recorded the country’s biggest waves, averaging 3 metres. The biggest recorded wave here was over 21 metres. With its dangerous rips and sweeps, this is a beach to admire, not to swim at.
View from road down to Macquarie Heads

View from road down to Macquarie Heads


View from road down to Macquarie Heads

View from road down to Macquarie Heads


View from road down to Macquarie Heads

View from road down to Macquarie Heads


Panorama of Ocean Beach near Strahan

Panorama of Ocean Beach near Strahan


Ocean Beach, Strahan

Ocean Beach, Strahan


Ocean Beach, Strahan

Ocean Beach, Strahan

Late in the afternoon, we attended a performance of "The Ship That Never Was" in Strahan. The Round Earth Theatre Company, founded by Richard Davey, performs in Strahan, West Coast, Tasmania. Each night the company performs Australia's longest-running play, The Ship That Never Was. During the day the actors work as tour guides on Sarah Island explaining the history and unique story of this Tasmanian penal settlement. The play is built around the construction of the ship and ingeniously uses audience members including children to provide additional cast.
The Ship That never Was - Australia's longest running play

The Ship That never Was - Australia's longest running play


The Ship That never Was

The Ship That never Was

Wednesday was overcast as we packed up for our next destination, Queenstown then travelling on the Lyell Highway down to Hamilton. Queenstown is still a thriving mining community. The mountains around the town still show the scars of many decades of mining. The hillsides are still denuded of trees although some rehabilitation has taken place.
View from lookout near Queenstown

View from lookout near Queenstown


Road into Queenstown

Road into Queenstown


Railway Station Queenstown

Railway Station Queenstown


Railway Station Queenstown

Railway Station Queenstown


Lyell Highway east out of Queenstown

Lyell Highway east out of Queenstown

Our next stop was at Nelson Falls in the World Heritage Gordon-Franklin Wild Rivers National Park. These falls were a short 20 minute return trip off the road and were well worth the effort.
Nelson Falls

Nelson Falls


Nelson falls walk in

Nelson falls walk in


Nelson Falls

Nelson Falls


Nelson Falls

Nelson Falls

We called into Lake St Clair but decided not to stay overnight? The walks around the lake looked inviting apart from 9 degree Celsius temperatures in the middle of the day.
Lake St Clair, Cradle Mountain - Lake St Clair National Park

Lake St Clair, Cradle Mountain - Lake St Clair National Park


Lake St Clair, Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park

Lake St Clair, Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park

Just to the east of Derwent Bridge is The Wall in the Wilderness. Primarily made from rare Huon pine, creator/designer Greg Duncan is carving 100 metres of Central Highland history. The Wall is being carved from three-metre high wooden panels is estimated to be complete by 2015. . The carved panels will tell the history of the harsh Central Highlands region - beginning with the indigenous people, then to the pioneering timber harvesters, pastoralists, miners and Hydro workers.
The Wall, Derwent Bridge

The Wall, Derwent Bridge

Further down the Lyell highway! We made a short stop at the Franklin River for a photo stop with Colleen beside the sign just as we did seven years ago when we visited Tassie.
Franklin River, Gordon-Franklin Wild Rivers National Park

Franklin River, Gordon-Franklin Wild Rivers National Park

We had another brief stop at Tarraleah to see the hydro electric Station on the Nive River and the associated plant in Tarraleah. this is a beautiful little town with park like gardens.
Nive River Hydro-Electric Station, Tarraleah

Nive River Hydro-Electric Station, Tarraleah


Nive River Hydro-Electric Station, Tarraleah

Nive River Hydro-Electric Station, Tarraleah


Nive River Hydro-Electric Station, Tarraleah

Nive River Hydro-Electric Station, Tarraleah

Our overnight stop was at the Hamilton Common. These campgrounds had a number of Queensland travellers. The grounds are provided by the council and have hot showers, laundry facilities and are situated beside the Clyde River. It was surprisingly cheap at $5 a night per vehicle.

Campground at Hamilton on banks of the Clyde River

Campground at Hamilton on banks of the Clyde River


Main Street, Hamilton

Main Street, Hamilton


1830 stone house, Hamilton

1830 stone house, Hamilton


Old Post Office, Hamilton

Old Post Office, Hamilton


Old Post Office circa 1835, Hamilton

Old Post Office circa 1835, Hamilton


Roses in Hamilton

Roses in Hamilton

Our last camp stop for the week was at Bothwell, the home of the first golf course in Australia.
Grazing country between Hamilton and Bothwell

Grazing country between Hamilton and Bothwell


Croaker's Alley, Bothwell

Croaker's Alley, Bothwell


Croaker's Alley, Bothwell

Croaker's Alley, Bothwell

We stayed at the council run Bothwell Camping and Caravan park. It was well set up with hot showers and free washer and dryer and only $15 per night. We had the place almost to ourselves. The grounds were behind the Australiasian Golf Museum (Bothwell had the first golf course in Australia) and is accommodated in the old school house. The building housed the two teacher school from 1887 to 1956.

Australiasian Golf Museum, Bothwell

Australiasian Golf Museum, Bothwell


Park across road from Bothwell Golf Museum

Park across road from Bothwell Golf Museum


stone house(1820S) in Market Street, Bothwell

stone house(1820S) in Market Street, Bothwell


Plaque commemorating first shipment of black cattle from Scotland in 1824, Bothwell

Plaque commemorating first shipment of black cattle from Scotland in 1824, Bothwell

Last night we had very generous Lamb Shanks and beef Schnitzel at the Castle Hotel, one of Australia's oldest hotels with a continuous licence since 1829.
Castle Hotel 1829 Bothwell

Castle Hotel 1829 Bothwell

This afternoon we drove out to the Nant Distillery. The property was settled in 1821 and buildings date from that year. The newer building that forms part of the restaurant dates from 1857.
Nant Distillery  - property settled 1821

Nant Distillery - property settled 1821


Nant Distillery - property settled 1821

Nant Distillery - property settled 1821


Nant Distillery - property settled 1821

Nant Distillery - property settled 1821


Nant Distillery restaurant - property settled 1821

Nant Distillery restaurant - property settled 1821


Nant Distillery - property settled 1821

Nant Distillery - property settled 1821

I recognised a Bentley parked in a shed at Nant. It was brought to Tasmania for Princess Mary's visit to Tasmania and was the vehicle used previously by GG Quentin Bryce.
image

image

In the morning we are travelling to Oatlands (about 80km north of Hobart on the Midland Highway) to have lunch with Kerry and Marie and then drive up to Launceston.

Posted by Kangatraveller 22:00 Archived in Australia Comments (0)

(Entries 6 - 10 of 17) « Page 1 [2] 3 4 »