A Travellerspoint blog

November 2013

WEEK 9 - OATLANDS to COCKLE CREEK

Leaving the Midlands to go south of Hobart to The End of the Road

After a a very comfortable day in conversation and catching up with old friends, we drove back to Launceston for three days. We felt easy about leaving our Quantum in the camping area beside Lake Dulverton at Oatlands.
Lake Dulverton Camping Area at Oatlands

Lake Dulverton Camping Area at Oatlands


Lake Dulverton Camping Area at Oatlands

Lake Dulverton Camping Area at Oatlands

Main Street Oatlands

Main Street Oatlands


Main Street Oatlands

Main Street Oatlands


MGs parked near hotel in Oatlands

MGs parked near hotel in Oatlands


old shed at Oatlands

old shed at Oatlands

We returned Wednesday afternoon to have a look at the old Callington Mill at Oatlands.
Callington Mill at Oatlands

Callington Mill at Oatlands


Callington Mill at Oatlands

Callington Mill at Oatlands


Callington Mill at Oatlands

Callington Mill at Oatlands


Mill Lane, Callington Mill at Oatlands

Mill Lane, Callington Mill at Oatlands

Thursday morning was a wet and windy day so we packed up early and headed south. We took the A1 to Hobart and then the A6 down to Cockle Creek. We stopped for breakfast at the camping ground on the foreshore at Franklin.

Derwent River at Glenorchy

Derwent River at Glenorchy

Derwent River at Glenorchy

Derwent River at Glenorchy


Camp ground at Franklin foreshore

Camp ground at Franklin foreshore


Camp ground at Franklin foreshore

Camp ground at Franklin foreshore

We had planned to stay the night there but as the day was young and the weather was rain forecasted for the day, we decided to travel onto Cockle Creek the most southerly road in Australia. We took some pictures along the way at Dover, Southport and at the end of the road at Cockle Creek.
Dover

Dover


Southport looking towards Bruny Island

Southport looking towards Bruny Island


Southport, Tasmania

Southport, Tasmania

Here are some pictures of our camping ground at Cockle Creek.
Cockle Creek Camp Ground

Cockle Creek Camp Ground

The bridge over Cockle Creek is due to be closed to all traffic with the exceptions of locals and National Parks officers in December and this has raised the ire of many people/
The End of the Road, Cockle Creek, most southerly road in Australia

The End of the Road, Cockle Creek, most southerly road in Australia


Bridge at Cockle Creek

Bridge at Cockle Creek


Cockle Creek inland of bridge

Cockle Creek inland of bridge


Lagoon at Cockle Creek

Lagoon at Cockle Creek

We walked down to the Whale Sculpture on the beach. Near the National Parks station there is a sign saying End of the Road as this is the most southerly street in Tasmania.
NP signage at Cockle Creek

NP signage at Cockle Creek


View towards Cockle Creek

View towards Cockle Creek


Fly wheel from old timber mill middle of last century

Fly wheel from old timber mill middle of last century


Fishers Point Recherche Bay

Fishers Point Recherche Bay


Monument to the Southern Right Whale

Monument to the Southern Right Whale


Monument to the Southern Right Whale

Monument to the Southern Right Whale


Whale Monument

Whale Monument

ON Saturday we broke camp early and headed for Lune River to catch the Ida Bay Tourist Train. On the way we passed through the tiny community of Catamaran.
Catamaran

Catamaran

The Ida bay Railway is the last operating bush tramway in Tasmania and also has the distinction of being the most southerly railway in Australia. The 2'0" gauge line was constructed in 1922 to carry limestone from quarries south east of the Lune River to a Wharf at Brick Point on Ida Bay.

After World War II changes were made to the operation. New workshops, engine shed and workman's quarters were constructed beside Cockle Creek road. These facilities now form the operational headquarters of the line. Five Malcolm Moore petrol locos were acquired from the Army surplus so that the last of the steam locos could be retired.

1950 saw a new quarry closer to the Lune River so transport was changed by filling steel or wooden boxes with limestone and placing them onto four wheel wagons for transport to the wharf. Loaded trains of 12 wagons were kept in check by over-ride brakes connected to the wagon couplings. The carriage of limestone went to trucks in 1975.

In 1977 the Tasmanian Govt purchased the railway and rolling stock. It began as a tourist attraction on 20 December 1977.

The railway was considered unsafe in 2002 and closed. New owners took over in January 2005 and implemented an intensive maintenance program.

The two hour return trip takes in the sights of Ida Bay through to Deep Hole. At Deep Hole, you can look across to Bruny Island and the southern most town of Southport.
Ida Bay Railway Station at Lune River

Ida Bay Railway Station at Lune River


Ida Bay Railway Station at Lune River

Ida Bay Railway Station at Lune River


Ida Bay

Ida Bay


Ida Bay

Ida Bay


Panorama at Ida Bay

Panorama at Ida Bay


Cemetery at Ida Bay Junction

Cemetery at Ida Bay Junction


Ida Bay train terminus

Ida Bay train terminus


Ida Bay with Bruny Island in background

Ida Bay with Bruny Island in background


Train at Ida Bay terminus

Train at Ida Bay terminus

We stayed at the Tahune Air Walk on Saturday night as we wanted to do some of the forest walks and then the Tahune Air Walk when it opened at 9.00am. This camp was one of our best so far with access to facilities and the break of a new sunny day.

Posted by Kangatraveller 21:26 Comments (0)

WEEK 8- ARTHUR RIVER, STRAHAN, BOTHWELL, MIDLANDS TAS

Enjoying fine weather on the west coast before heading east

semi-overcast 15 °C

Sunday morning was another beautiful day in Arthur River. We were on the road early and enjoyed the beautiful drive back to Smithton.
Dairying country west of Smithton

Dairying country west of Smithton


Dairying country west of Smithton

Dairying country west of Smithton

We drove east to Burnie and then took the main road down past Cradle Mountain to Strahan. This part of Tasmania relies on logging as the main economic driver. Here are some pictures of the areas.
Taswoods Eucalyptus forests south of Burnie

Taswoods Eucalyptus forests south of Burnie


Taswoods Eucalyptus forests south of Burnie

Taswoods Eucalyptus forests south of Burnie

Zeehan was our lunch stop on Sunday. We had plenty of time to visit the superb West Coast Heritage Centre incorporating the West Coast Pioneers' Museum in the Main Street of Zeehan.
Zeehan School of Mines

Zeehan School of Mines


Zeehan School of Mines and Mettalurgy - 1894-1930

Zeehan School of Mines and Mettalurgy - 1894-1930


Zeehan Gaiety Theatre and Police Station with Court House behind

Zeehan Gaiety Theatre and Police Station with Court House behind


Gaiety Theatre near Zeehan Pioneers Museum

Gaiety Theatre near Zeehan Pioneers Museum


No 8 Krauss Locomotive at Zeehan Pioneers Museum

No 8 Krauss Locomotive at Zeehan Pioneers Museum


Mining machinery at rear of Zeehan Pioneers Museum

Mining machinery at rear of Zeehan Pioneers Museum


Blacksmith's Shop at rear of Zeehan Pioneers Museum

Blacksmith's Shop at rear of Zeehan Pioneers Museum


Beyer-Peacock Locomotive C1 at Zeehan Pioneers Museum

Beyer-Peacock Locomotive C1 at Zeehan Pioneers Museum

King O'Malley, an American, called Zeehan home when he was the Member for West Tasmania. King O'Malley was instrumental in forming "the people's bank", the Commonwealth and in establishing Canberra as the site of the new capital of Australia.
King O'Malley, The West Coast Pioneers Museum

King O'Malley, The West Coast Pioneers Museum

Strahan is 41 km south of Zeehan on the West Coast. Strahan is built on the foreshore of Macquarie Harbour. Macquarie Harbour is a large, shallow, but navigable by shallow draft vessels inlet on the West Coast of Tasmania, Australia. The harbour is named after Scottish Major General Lachlan Macquarie, 5th Governor of New South Wales. The harbour is six times the size of Sydney Harbour And half as big a Port Phillip Bay. Seven large fish farms grow salmon and trout.
View from Railway Station back across to Esplanade, Strahan

View from Railway Station back across to Esplanade, Strahan


Esplanade at Strahan

Esplanade at Strahan


Panorama of Petuna Fish Farm, Macquarie Harbour (4)

Panorama of Petuna Fish Farm, Macquarie Harbour (4)


Petuna Fish Farm, Macquarie Harbour

Petuna Fish Farm, Macquarie Harbour

As Monday was a clear sunny day, we boarded the Lady Jane Franklin 11 for the cruise. Our journey was to take us out to Hell's Gates (the very narrow entrance to Macquarie Harbour) and out into the open sea. The cruise continued on up the Gordon River which empties into Macquarie Harbour. Upstream of the Gordon, it is joined by the Franklin River. We stopped upriver at Heritage Landing.
Esplanade at Strahan

Esplanade at Strahan


David on the Lady Jane Franklin 11

David on the Lady Jane Franklin 11


Sign Franklin - Gordon Wild Rivers NP

Sign Franklin - Gordon Wild Rivers NP


Mouth of Gordon River, Macquarie Harbour

Mouth of Gordon River, Macquarie Harbour


Gordon River

Gordon River


Gordon River

Gordon River


Gordon River

Gordon River


Frenchman's Cap

Frenchman's Cap


Heritage Walk, Gordon River

Heritage Walk, Gordon River


Heritage Walk, Gordon River

Heritage Walk, Gordon River


Heritage Walk, Gordon River

Heritage Walk, Gordon River


Heritage Walk, Gordon River )

Heritage Walk, Gordon River )

After a nice buffet lunch on board the boat as it returned down the Gordon, we stopped off at Sarah Island. The Macquarie Harbour Penal Station was established on Sarah Island, Macquarie Harbour in the former colony of Van Diemen's Land, now Tasmania, Australia, operated between 1822 and 1833. The settlement housed mainly male convicts, with a small number of women. During its 11 years of operation, the penal colony achieved a reputation as one of the harshest penal settlements in the Australian colonies.
Disembarking from  Lady Jane Franklin 11

Disembarking from Lady Jane Franklin 11


Porpoise trailing the Lady Jane Franklin 11 in Macquarie Harbour

Porpoise trailing the Lady Jane Franklin 11 in Macquarie Harbour

The penal station was established as a place of banishment within the Australian colonies. It took the worst convicts and those who had escaped from other settlements. The isolated land was ideally suited for its purpose. It was separated from the mainland by treacherous seas, surrounded by a mountainous wilderness and was hundreds of miles away from the colony's other settled areas. The only seaward access was through a treacherous narrow channel known as Hell's Gates.
Lighthouse at Hell's Gate

Lighthouse at Hell's Gate


Lighthouse at Hell's Gate

Lighthouse at Hell's Gate

Despite its isolated location, a considerable number of convicts attempted to escape from the island. Bushranger Matthew Brady was among a party that successfully escaped to Hobart in 1824 after tying up their overseer and seizing a boat. James Goodwin was pardoned after his 1828 escape and was subsequently employed to make official surveys of the wilderness he had passed through. Sarah Island's most infamous escapee was Alexander Pearce who managed to get away twice. On both occasions, he cannibalized his fellow escapees.
Guide on Sarah Island

Guide on Sarah Island


Sarah Island

Sarah Island

A shipbuilding industry which produced 131 ships was established on the island. Convicts were employed in the shipbuilding industry. For a short period, it was the largest shipbuilding operation in the Australian colonies. Chained convicts had the task of cutting down Huon Pine trees and rafting the logs down the river. Eventually the heavily forested island was cleared by the convicts. A tall wall was then built along the windward side of the island to provide shelter for the shipyards from the roaring forties blowing up the harbour.
Sarah Island

Sarah Island


Sarah Island

Sarah Island


Sarah Island

Sarah Island


Sarah Island

Sarah Island


The Penitentiary, Sarah Island

The Penitentiary, Sarah Island

In the afternoon, we went for a drive down an 11km gravel road to see Macquarie Heads from the shore. Just around the Heads is Ocean Beach. Ocean Beach, at Strahan on the wild west coast of Tasmania, is the highest energy beach in Australia and has recorded the country’s biggest waves, averaging 3 metres. The biggest recorded wave here was over 21 metres. With its dangerous rips and sweeps, this is a beach to admire, not to swim at.
View from road down to Macquarie Heads

View from road down to Macquarie Heads


View from road down to Macquarie Heads

View from road down to Macquarie Heads


View from road down to Macquarie Heads

View from road down to Macquarie Heads


Panorama of Ocean Beach near Strahan

Panorama of Ocean Beach near Strahan


Ocean Beach, Strahan

Ocean Beach, Strahan


Ocean Beach, Strahan

Ocean Beach, Strahan

Late in the afternoon, we attended a performance of "The Ship That Never Was" in Strahan. The Round Earth Theatre Company, founded by Richard Davey, performs in Strahan, West Coast, Tasmania. Each night the company performs Australia's longest-running play, The Ship That Never Was. During the day the actors work as tour guides on Sarah Island explaining the history and unique story of this Tasmanian penal settlement. The play is built around the construction of the ship and ingeniously uses audience members including children to provide additional cast.
The Ship That never Was - Australia's longest running play

The Ship That never Was - Australia's longest running play


The Ship That never Was

The Ship That never Was

Wednesday was overcast as we packed up for our next destination, Queenstown then travelling on the Lyell Highway down to Hamilton. Queenstown is still a thriving mining community. The mountains around the town still show the scars of many decades of mining. The hillsides are still denuded of trees although some rehabilitation has taken place.
View from lookout near Queenstown

View from lookout near Queenstown


Road into Queenstown

Road into Queenstown


Railway Station Queenstown

Railway Station Queenstown


Railway Station Queenstown

Railway Station Queenstown


Lyell Highway east out of Queenstown

Lyell Highway east out of Queenstown

Our next stop was at Nelson Falls in the World Heritage Gordon-Franklin Wild Rivers National Park. These falls were a short 20 minute return trip off the road and were well worth the effort.
Nelson Falls

Nelson Falls


Nelson falls walk in

Nelson falls walk in


Nelson Falls

Nelson Falls


Nelson Falls

Nelson Falls

We called into Lake St Clair but decided not to stay overnight? The walks around the lake looked inviting apart from 9 degree Celsius temperatures in the middle of the day.
Lake St Clair, Cradle Mountain - Lake St Clair National Park

Lake St Clair, Cradle Mountain - Lake St Clair National Park


Lake St Clair, Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park

Lake St Clair, Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park

Just to the east of Derwent Bridge is The Wall in the Wilderness. Primarily made from rare Huon pine, creator/designer Greg Duncan is carving 100 metres of Central Highland history. The Wall is being carved from three-metre high wooden panels is estimated to be complete by 2015. . The carved panels will tell the history of the harsh Central Highlands region - beginning with the indigenous people, then to the pioneering timber harvesters, pastoralists, miners and Hydro workers.
The Wall, Derwent Bridge

The Wall, Derwent Bridge

Further down the Lyell highway! We made a short stop at the Franklin River for a photo stop with Colleen beside the sign just as we did seven years ago when we visited Tassie.
Franklin River, Gordon-Franklin Wild Rivers National Park

Franklin River, Gordon-Franklin Wild Rivers National Park

We had another brief stop at Tarraleah to see the hydro electric Station on the Nive River and the associated plant in Tarraleah. this is a beautiful little town with park like gardens.
Nive River Hydro-Electric Station, Tarraleah

Nive River Hydro-Electric Station, Tarraleah


Nive River Hydro-Electric Station, Tarraleah

Nive River Hydro-Electric Station, Tarraleah


Nive River Hydro-Electric Station, Tarraleah

Nive River Hydro-Electric Station, Tarraleah

Our overnight stop was at the Hamilton Common. These campgrounds had a number of Queensland travellers. The grounds are provided by the council and have hot showers, laundry facilities and are situated beside the Clyde River. It was surprisingly cheap at $5 a night per vehicle.

Campground at Hamilton on banks of the Clyde River

Campground at Hamilton on banks of the Clyde River


Main Street, Hamilton

Main Street, Hamilton


1830 stone house, Hamilton

1830 stone house, Hamilton


Old Post Office, Hamilton

Old Post Office, Hamilton


Old Post Office circa 1835, Hamilton

Old Post Office circa 1835, Hamilton


Roses in Hamilton

Roses in Hamilton

Our last camp stop for the week was at Bothwell, the home of the first golf course in Australia.
Grazing country between Hamilton and Bothwell

Grazing country between Hamilton and Bothwell


Croaker's Alley, Bothwell

Croaker's Alley, Bothwell


Croaker's Alley, Bothwell

Croaker's Alley, Bothwell

We stayed at the council run Bothwell Camping and Caravan park. It was well set up with hot showers and free washer and dryer and only $15 per night. We had the place almost to ourselves. The grounds were behind the Australiasian Golf Museum (Bothwell had the first golf course in Australia) and is accommodated in the old school house. The building housed the two teacher school from 1887 to 1956.

Australiasian Golf Museum, Bothwell

Australiasian Golf Museum, Bothwell


Park across road from Bothwell Golf Museum

Park across road from Bothwell Golf Museum


stone house(1820S) in Market Street, Bothwell

stone house(1820S) in Market Street, Bothwell


Plaque commemorating first shipment of black cattle from Scotland in 1824, Bothwell

Plaque commemorating first shipment of black cattle from Scotland in 1824, Bothwell

Last night we had very generous Lamb Shanks and beef Schnitzel at the Castle Hotel, one of Australia's oldest hotels with a continuous licence since 1829.
Castle Hotel 1829 Bothwell

Castle Hotel 1829 Bothwell

This afternoon we drove out to the Nant Distillery. The property was settled in 1821 and buildings date from that year. The newer building that forms part of the restaurant dates from 1857.
Nant Distillery  - property settled 1821

Nant Distillery - property settled 1821


Nant Distillery - property settled 1821

Nant Distillery - property settled 1821


Nant Distillery - property settled 1821

Nant Distillery - property settled 1821


Nant Distillery restaurant - property settled 1821

Nant Distillery restaurant - property settled 1821


Nant Distillery - property settled 1821

Nant Distillery - property settled 1821

I recognised a Bentley parked in a shed at Nant. It was brought to Tasmania for Princess Mary's visit to Tasmania and was the vehicle used previously by GG Quentin Bryce.
image

image

In the morning we are travelling to Oatlands (about 80km north of Hobart on the Midland Highway) to have lunch with Kerry and Marie and then drive up to Launceston.

Posted by Kangatraveller 22:00 Archived in Australia Comments (0)

WEEK 7 - Launceston and Arthur River

Return to Launceston

sunny 25 °C

Sunday morning turned out to be a day of beautiful weather in Launceston. We left our camp at Chain of Lagoons the day before as we were running low on power and the weather had taken a turn for worse with constant showers and being cold and wet.

We were due to return to Launceston the day after as Colleen had a dental appointment on the Tuesday and we both wanted to help Paul with preparing his house for sale .A few solid days with "karchering" the house and pathways and being quite brutal in terms of culling excess furniture and the property looked a real treat.

We did have a little time to admire the many beautiful examples of early 1800s architecture around Launceston. Launceston is located on the beautiful Tamar River in northern Tasmania. It's the third oldest city in Australia and has retained much of it stunning architectural heritage.

Old terrace houses in St John Street

Old terrace houses in St John Street


old houses near St Vincents and church clock tower

old houses near St Vincents and church clock tower


Early 1800s St John Street, Launceston

Early 1800s St John Street, Launceston


1800s residences in St John Street, Launceston

1800s residences in St John Street, Launceston


1800s terrace houses in St John Street, Launceston

1800s terrace houses in St John Street, Launceston

Anaethetist - Dr William Pugh, first person to use anaesthetics in the Southern Hemisphere.

William Russ Pugh (1805-1897), medical practitioner, arrived in Hobart Town in the Derwent in December 1835, and reputedly walked soon after to Launceston, where the following May he married a fellow passenger Cornelia Ann, the daughter of G. A. Kirton, a London solicitor.

William Russ Pugh was credited with administering the first surgical anaesthetic in the southern hemisphere. Pugh received instruction in Edinburgh and Dublin, and in 1835 set up practice in Launceston. An enthusiastic experimenter, he produced coal gas to light his house, and the ether for his anaesthetics. On 7 June 1847 he performed two operations at St John's Hospital, removing a tumour from a woman's jaw and cataracts from a man, under ether anaesthesia. That day he wrote an account of the procedures for the Australian Medical Journal.
The picture below show Dr Pugh's former residence.

Anaethetist house in Launceston

Anaethetist house in Launceston

Boags Brewery

Boag's Brewery (J. Boag & Son) is an Australian brewery company founded in 1883 by James Boag and his son, also named James, in Launceston, Tasmania. It is now owned by Lion Nathan Ltd, a Trans-Tasman subsidiary company of Japanese beverage conglomerate, Kirin. All of the company's beers are produced in Launceston.

Boags Beer ad - Born in tasmania, raised all over Australia

Boags Beer ad - Born in tasmania, raised all over Australia


Boags Brewery, Launceston (2)

Boags Brewery, Launceston (2)


Sign on Boags Brewery, Launceston

Sign on Boags Brewery, Launceston


Customs House Mews now luxury units - Everything old is new again.

Customs House Mews now luxury units - Everything old is new again.

Old Post Office

The clock tower is one of the most photographed buildings in the city, and people spoke freely of their affection for it, and its importance to the city.
After the Launceston General Post Office was built in 1889, a group of residents formed The Launceston Clock and Chimes Committee in 1906 to raise funds to extend the tower's height, and install the clock and chimes.

Old Post Office

Old Post Office


Sculptures in Civic square, Launceston

Sculptures in Civic square, Launceston


Town Hall

Town Hall

Central Launceston has many old buildings, in particular bank buildings, which have been given a new lease of life as commercial premises.
Bank of NSW building 1817 (2)

Bank of NSW building 1817 (2)


former bank building with new lease of life in Launceston mall

former bank building with new lease of life in Launceston mall


Crown Milled Rolled Oats and Oatmeal

Crown Milled Rolled Oats and Oatmeal

Albert Hall and the Gatekeepers Cottage

The Albert Hall is a convention centre in Launceston, Tasmania in the style of high Victorian architecture, first opened as the main structure for the Tasmanian Industrial exhibition which ran from 25 November 1891 to 22 March 1892.
Albert Hall

Albert Hall

Next to Albert Hall is Kings Bridge Cottage which is nestled on the edge of a 200 million year old dolerite cliff, overlooking the South Esk River. The cottage was built in the 1890s to house the gatekeeper for the Reserve.
Gamekeepers Cottage in royal Albert Park

Gamekeepers Cottage in royal Albert Park

The Cataract Gorge Reserve covers 192 hectares and is an inspiring place for tourists, artists, nature lovers and the local community. More than 500,000 people visit the iconic location each year to swim, walk, kayak, dine and relax. It has an abundance of flora and fauna, with 25 threatened flora species and seven threatened fauna species. Amazingly, the Gorge is less than one kilometre from the city centre.

Launceston is located on the beautiful Tamar River in northern Tasmania. It's the third oldest city in Australia and has retained much of it stunning architectural heritage.

Inverisk Precinct

The Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery (QVMAG) has a part of the museum located at the Inveresk Precinct. Its other site is at Royal Park and when combined it becomes the largest museum in Australia located out of a capital city. It includes a working planetarium and displays related to Launceston's industrial environments and railway workshops.

Inveresk Precinct, Launceston

Inveresk Precinct, Launceston


Academy of the Arts, Inveresk

Academy of the Arts, Inveresk


Museum at Inveresk - ex Railway workshops

Museum at Inveresk - ex Railway workshops

Friday morning we had finished with tasks in Launceston. We headed north towards Devonport and stopped for an early lunch at the Bakery Café at Elizabeth Town.
Bakery Cafe at Elizabeth Town

Bakery Cafe at Elizabeth Town

We took the Bass highway west along the north coast to Burnie, Wynyard and Stanley. Table Cape is 5km west of Wynyard and is known for the rolling fields of tulips. We saw a few end of season tulips only but the view was worth the visit.
Tulips at Table Cape

Tulips at Table Cape


Panorama from Table Cape Lookout

Panorama from Table Cape Lookout


View from Table Cape

View from Table Cape


View from Table Cape

View from Table Cape


Lighthouse at Table Cape

Lighthouse at Table Cape


Panorama from Table Cape

Panorama from Table Cape

We shad a brief stop at Stanley to take some pictures of The Nut.
Stanley

Stanley


The Nut at Stanley

The Nut at Stanley

We looked at the weather forecasts and it seemed the west coast might have a few days of sunshine so we went to Smithton and then on to Arthur River. We planned to take the gravel road down through the Tarkine but this was not to be. There had been a landslip and the road will be closed for about five months.
The Edge of the World Lookout at Arthur River

The Edge of the World Lookout at Arthur River


The Edge of the World Lookout at Arthur River

The Edge of the World Lookout at Arthur River


The Edge of the World Lookout at Arthur River

The Edge of the World Lookout at Arthur River


Plaque at The Edge of the World Lookout at Arthur River

Plaque at The Edge of the World Lookout at Arthur River


North bank of the Arthur River

North bank of the Arthur River

We stayed at Peppermint Campground in Arthur River. This was a grassy sheltered place right in the middle of this township. We drove to the Edge of the World Lookout on the southern side of Arthur River. On Saturday morning we booked to take the river cruise on the MV George Robinson.
Peppermint Camp Ground, Arthur River

Peppermint Camp Ground, Arthur River


Mouth of the Arthur River

Mouth of the Arthur River


Arthur River

Arthur River


Arthur River, north western Tasmania

Arthur River, north western Tasmania

This morning (Saturday) has been an unbelievably beautiful day starting with a cool morning and some clouds and ending in brilliant sunshine in the mid twenties. We took the Arthur River cruise - five hours up the river including lunch in the Tarkine forest. The Arthur River is pristine as it has never been logged or dammed and the last hot fire to go through was 650 years ago. It is claimed that the Tarkins is the largest remaining Gondwana type forest left in the world.

The Arthur River is very rich in tannins and this brings out beautiful reflections on the mirror like surface.
Mouth of the Arthur River - never logged or dammed - last wild river in Tasmania

Mouth of the Arthur River - never logged or dammed - last wild river in Tasmania


Colleen ready to board the MV George Robinson - 5.5m boat designed on last century river boat

Colleen ready to board the MV George Robinson - 5.5m boat designed on last century river boat


Arthur River

Arthur River


Reflections on the Arthur River

Reflections on the Arthur River

The Tarkine - rainforest ferns Arthur River

The Tarkine - rainforest ferns Arthur River

The Tarkine - hardwoods are very slow to rot - may take hundreds of years

The Tarkine - hardwoods are very slow to rot - may take hundreds of years

Arthur River is rich in tannins that help reflect surrounding landscape

Arthur River is rich in tannins that help reflect surrounding landscape

Reflections on the Arthur River

Reflections on the Arthur River


Lunch camp BBQ - 14km up the Arthur River

Lunch camp BBQ - 14km up the Arthur River

Pademelon and Joey at our lunch camp 14km up the Arthur River

Pademelon and Joey at our lunch camp 14km up the Arthur River

White breasted sea eagle high up in tree

White breasted sea eagle high up in tree

Sea eagle  on the Arthur River

Sea eagle on the Arthur River

White breasted sea eagle seizing fish from the river

White breasted sea eagle seizing fish from the river

in the morning we plan to drive back up through Smithton and then to Burnis and down to the middle of the west coast to Strahan for a few days.

Posted by Kangatraveller 22:51 Archived in Australia Comments (0)

WEEK 6 - BINALONG BAY TO CHAIN OF LAGOONS BEACH

St Helens, Swimcart Beach, Chain of Lagoons Beach and back to Launceston.

Friday night we camped just to the north of St Helens at Moulting Bay. This was a very pleasant spot with just a few neighbours.
Moulting Bay campsite

Moulting Bay campsite


Moulting Bay

Moulting Bay

We went for a drive up to The Gardens, north of Binalong bay.
Panorama View from the Gardens

Panorama View from the Gardens


View from the Gardens

View from the Gardens

Saturday afternoon saw us at the Big 4 Caravan Park for two nights to allow us time to do some of the necessities of camping life - empty the black water tanks, fill up on water, shop for supplies and have some short drives around the area .
St Helens marina

St Helens marina


Georges Bay, St Helens

Georges Bay, St Helens


Georges Bay, St Helens

Georges Bay, St Helens


Burns Bay, St Helens Point

Burns Bay, St Helens Point


Burns Bay, St Helens Point

Burns Bay, St Helens Point


Burns Bay, St Helens Point

Burns Bay, St Helens Point


Wildlife at St Helens Holiday Village

Wildlife at St Helens Holiday Village

At the park, we saw another couple with a Quantum. Bruce and Lyn from Samford. We exchanges stories and places we were impressed with. They were heading for Waterhouse Point, our last destination, the next morning. We picked up some very good tips from them as they have had their Quantum for four years.

On Monday morning, we packed up and left for Swimcart Beach some 15km to the north on Binalong Bay. We stopped at Lease 65 just north of St Helens for some oysters. Freshly harvested large Pacific oysters were $8 a dozen.

We camped right on the beachfront with only about 5 metres to get onto the beach. Here are some pictures. One morning, Colleen called out to tell me there was a snake outside. I found two Slimy Skinks either copulating or fighting. For the sake of propriety, let's say they were fighting over territory.
Swimcart Beach, Binalong Bay

Swimcart Beach, Binalong Bay


Our campsite between the road and the beach

Our campsite between the road and the beach


Swimcart Beach

Swimcart Beach


Swimcart Beach, Binalong Bay

Swimcart Beach, Binalong Bay


Swimcart beach from our campsite at noon

Swimcart beach from our campsite at noon


Swimcart beach at dawn

Swimcart beach at dawn


Swimcart beach at dawn

Swimcart beach at dawn


Slimy Skinks fighting!!!

Slimy Skinks fighting!!!

The top end of Swimcart Beach is Cosy Corner South with a beautiful beach stretching north to Cosy Corner North. It was an easy walk up to the rocks then around to Cosy Corner.
Rocks at Cosy Corner South

Rocks at Cosy Corner South


Rocks at Cosy Corner South

Rocks at Cosy Corner South


Swimcart Beach from Cosy Corner South

Swimcart Beach from Cosy Corner South


Flowers on dune

Flowers on dune


Beach between Cosy Corner North and South

Beach between Cosy Corner North and South

We left Swimcart Beach a day early when the wind picked up and the weather turned blustery with showers. We went through to Chain of Lagoons Beach to camp for a few days. This was another beautiful camping spot except for the rain setting in.
Chain of Lagoons Beach  - lagoon

Chain of Lagoons Beach - lagoon


Chain of Lagoons Beach campsites

Chain of Lagoons Beach campsites


Chain of Lagoons Beach campsites

Chain of Lagoons Beach campsites


Chain of Lagoons Beach

Chain of Lagoons Beach


Chain of Lagoons Beach

Chain of Lagoons Beach

Our solar continued to recharge the batteries but at a very much slower rate. With the prospect of more rainy weather we decided to head back to Launceston on Saturday morning.

St Marys

St Marys


St Marys

St Marys


Scenery between St Marys and Fingal

Scenery between St Marys and Fingal

We had lunch at Perth, a little place south of Launceston.
Scene south of Perth

Scene south of Perth

We stopped at Franklin House just south of Launceston. Franklin House in Tasmania, Australia is a historic house that is preserved by Australia's National Trust. It was built of Australian cedar. It is a Georgian style house that was built in 1838 for Britton Jones, a Launceston brewer and innkeeper. It was later a school for boys. The house and gardens are located in Franklin Village, Tasmania
Franklin House, Launceston

Franklin House, Launceston

Most of the next week will be spent in Launceston with Colleen looking forward to root canal and both of us helping Paul with selling his house.

Posted by Kangatraveller 00:12 Comments (0)

WEEK 5 - Launceston to St Helens

Waterhouse Conservation Area and Mt William National Park

This is living the dream. Early on Monday morning we picked up our caravan at Treasure Island Caravan Park and headed north east on the Tasman Highway to Scottsdale. The Tasman Highway heads east from Launceston through Scottsdale to St Helens on the east coast. We headed north from Scottsdale to travel to Bridport. We were going to stop in Scottsdale for fresh bread but decided to leave it until Bridport. Yes, Bridport has a bakery but it does not open on Mondays. The next best thing was the IGA next door for bread and hot chicken for lunch.
Scene Launceston to Scottsdale

Scene Launceston to Scottsdale

]Scene Launceston to Scottsdale

Scene Launceston to Scottsdale


Panorama Lookout near Scottsdale

Panorama Lookout near Scottsdale


Lookout near Scottsdale

Lookout near Scottsdale


Wood carvings near Scottsdale

Wood carvings near Scottsdale

Bridport is a little fishing village with basic services. After lunch in the park we drove north east to Waterhouse Point Conservation Area. We camped at The Village Green at Waterhouse Point for two nights and after the wind blew in on Wednesday morning we decided to move on to a more sheltered camp site. We were sorry to leave here as we almost had the place to ourselves with only one other campervan whose occupants were rarely seen. Our campsite was a short walk to the beach and had an added bonus of a beautiful piece of carpet like grass.
Bridport

Bridport


Waterhouse Point Conservation Area

Waterhouse Point Conservation Area


Waterhouse Conservation Area

Waterhouse Conservation Area


Beach at Village Green, Waterhouse Conservation Area

Beach at Village Green, Waterhouse Conservation Area


Bird on Beach at Waterhouse Point

Bird on Beach at Waterhouse Point


Flower on Beach at Village Green, Waterhouse Conservation Area

Flower on Beach at Village Green, Waterhouse Conservation Area


Panorama Beach at Village Green, Waterhouse Conservation Area

Panorama Beach at Village Green, Waterhouse Conservation Area


Scene leaving Waterhouse Point Conservation Area

Scene leaving Waterhouse Point Conservation Area


Village Green Waterhouse Point

Village Green Waterhouse Point


Tuesday sunset at Waterhouse Point

Tuesday sunset at Waterhouse Point


Tree sheltering behind rock at Beach at Village Green, Waterhouse Conservation Area

Tree sheltering behind rock at Beach at Village Green, Waterhouse Conservation Area


native orchid

native orchid


Panorama  on Wednesday - Beach at Village Green, Waterhouse Conservation Area

Panorama on Wednesday - Beach at Village Green, Waterhouse Conservation Area

Wednesday morning we headed east to a little township named Gladstone. This little place is the gateway to Mt William National Park. Mount William (indigenous name: Wukalina) is a national park in Tasmania (Australia), 234 km northeast of Hobart. Established in 1973 as a 8,640 hectares large national park, it has been expanded multiple times, reaching 13,806 ha in 1980 and 18,439 ha in 1999.

The park provides protected habitat to eastern grey kangarooes, wombats, Bennetts wallabies, Tasmanian pademelons, echidnas, brush-tailed possums and Tasmanian devils.

Mount William National Park on Tasmania's far north-east coast is remote with undulating grasslands, large dunes, sweeping white beaches and an ocean varying from azure in the shallows to bright blue in deeper waters. The granite boulders in the surf zone are home to many sea birds like cormorants, terns and pelicans. We were to camp at Top Camp which is an oceanfront campsite on the beach between Musselroe Bay and Cape Naturaliste. This was on a very beautiful beach. As we drove in we noticed there were nearby windfarms. A lady out walking her dog suggested Stumpy Bay just south of Cape Naturaliste as a more protected campsite.

There are five camping areas along Stumpy Bay so we chose Stumpy Bay 1 which apparently has good beach fishing. People spend day and night catching good hauls of salmon. The area is absolutely beautiful. There is one or two bars of mobile reception if you walk up on a hill and hold your phone in the right way. We were going to leave on Sunday morning but as this weekend is a long weekend we decided to leave this morning as more and more people were starting to arrive. The Tasmanian caravanners seem to arrive with portable stoves and tons of firewood. They are also well organised with portable windbreaks (and loads more alcohol).
Top Camp Mt William National Park

Top Camp Mt William National Park


Wind farm near Musselroe Bay

Wind farm near Musselroe Bay


Stumpy Bay Camp 1 at Mt William National Park

Stumpy Bay Camp 1 at Mt William National Park


Stumpy Bay Camp 1 at Mt William National Park

Stumpy Bay Camp 1 at Mt William National Park


Stumpy Bay Camp 1 at Mt William National Park

Stumpy Bay Camp 1 at Mt William National Park


Stumpy Bay Camp 1 at Mt William National Park

Stumpy Bay Camp 1 at Mt William National Park


Stumpy Bay Camp 1 at Mt William National Park

Stumpy Bay Camp 1 at Mt William National Park


Stumpy Bay Camp 1 at Mt William National Park

Stumpy Bay Camp 1 at Mt William National Park


Mother and Joey at Stumpy Bay

Mother and Joey at Stumpy Bay


image

image

Our first stop this morning was at Little Blue Lake outside South Mount Cameron. Tin mining was the predominant industry since the 1880's. After the casserite was removed, clay (kolin) was left behind and when the mined areas filled with water, the water reflected on the clay showed as a brilliant turquoise colour.
Little Blue Lake near  South Mt Cameron

Little Blue Lake near South Mt Cameron


Little Blue Lake near  South Mt Cameron - clay deposits left after tin mining reflect sunlight and make the water appear turquoise blue

Little Blue Lake near South Mt Cameron - clay deposits left after tin mining reflect sunlight and make the water appear turquoise blue

Moorina is located on the Tasman Highway and was a major tin mining settlement with Chinese outnumbering the Caucasians. We stopped to see the monument to the Chinese - The Tin Dragon Trail which is located near the cemetery. We wandered amongst the old graves and it would seem that if you could survive childhood, childbirth and accidental death it would seem that there was a fairly good chance of reaching old age.
The Trail of the Tin Dragon Chinese memorial at Moorina

The Trail of the Tin Dragon Chinese memorial at Moorina


Chinese monument in Moorina Cemetery

Chinese monument in Moorina Cemetery

Just off the Highway was the Little Plains Lookout with an interesting story about the original inhabitant and his tiny hut. It is now owned by the Parks Service.
Little Plains Lookout

Little Plains Lookout


Little Plains Lookout

Little Plains Lookout

Further east we turned off at Pyengana to see the St Columba Falls. These are the tallest in Tasmania at 90 metres. In winter the flow over the falls in 220,000 litres per minute and an average of 42,000 litres per minute for the remainder of the year. The 400 metre walk is through spectacular rainforest. At the entrance hut, we read about Annie Beechley who was Australian Woman of the year in 1908 for surviving in the wilderness country where it was said "No man can survive."
Beginning of track to St Columba Falls, Pyengana

Beginning of track to St Columba Falls, Pyengana


Signage at St Columba Falls, Pyengana - the story of Annie Beechley 1908 Australian Woman of the Year

Signage at St Columba Falls, Pyengana - the story of Annie Beechley 1908 Australian Woman of the Year


St Columba Falls, Pyengana, 90 metres and one of the tallest in Tasmania

St Columba Falls, Pyengana, 90 metres and one of the tallest in Tasmania


St Columba Falls, Pyengana, 90 metres and one of the tallest in Tasmania

St Columba Falls, Pyengana, 90 metres and one of the tallest in Tasmania


Track to St Columba Falls, Pyengana

Track to St Columba Falls, Pyengana


Track to St Columba Falls, Pyengana

Track to St Columba Falls, Pyengana

On our way back from St Columba Falls, we called into the Pub in the Paddock. This aptly named business was established around 1880 and is located as its name describes. It's other attraction is Priscilla, the beer swilling pig. And what a size she is!!!!!
Pub in the Paddock, Pyengana

Pub in the Paddock, Pyengana


The Pub in the Paddock, Pyengana

The Pub in the Paddock, Pyengana


Pig at Pub in the Paddock, Pyengana

Pig at Pub in the Paddock, Pyengana


Pig at The Pub in the Paddock, Pyengana

Pig at The Pub in the Paddock, Pyengana

We stayed for lunch and were not sorry we spent an hour or so relaxing in the surrounds. Next stop, was the Pyengana Dairy Company which is a well known cheese factory run by fourth generation cheese maker John Healey and his family. The factory specialises in cloth bound cheddar. Our favourite is the Develish, a chilli and chive cheese. We bought up big and decided that for dinner we only needed wine and cheese.
Cheese Factory at Pyengana

Cheese Factory at Pyengana

Tonight we are camping at Moulting Bay camping area about 8 kms north east of St Helens. St Helens is the largest town on the north-east coast of Tasmania, Australia, on Georges Bay. It is known as the game fishing capital of Tasmania and is also renowned for its oysters (as are some other areas of Tasmania). It is located on the Tasman Highway, about 160 km east of Tasmania's second largest city, Launceston. In the early 2000s, the town was one of the fastest growing areas of Tasmania, and reached a population of 2049 at the 2006 census. St Helens is part of the Break O'Day Council, a council that includes the nearby town of Binalong Bay.

Posted by Kangatraveller 02:47 Comments (0)

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